Sometimes I lay awake at night and ponder this very same question…

“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” teaser trailer hits the net.

Update: Looks like the original video source has been yanked so I found another one. Quality is a bit grainy, but it works.

And, well, it doesn’t show a whole lot. Which is why it’s a teaser, but it’ll still whet the appetite a bit:

It’s really going to be rough knowing this one ends on a cliff-hanger, but I’m glad to see they’re devoting two movies to the story.

The latest trailer for “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” gets the blood pumping.

I loved the books and I’ve thought the movies have been about as good as they can be considering the amount of material they have to trim down. The next installment looks like it will not disappoint either:

Definitely looking forward to July 17th. I never managed to catch the last film while it was in theaters so I’ll be making a point of it this time.

You can watch the trailer in high-def over on Apple’s site.

Trailer for “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” hits the net.

Interesting trivia note about the child actor playing the part of Tom Riddle (a.k.a. Voldemort before he became a bad ass). His name is Hero Fiennes-Tiffin and he’s the nephew of Ralph Fiennes who plays Voldemort proper. Anyway, he’s the new trailer:

This small trailer doesn’t do it justice. You can see it in high definition here.

Final “Harry Potter” film might actually be two films.

Rumor has it that Warner Bros. might break the final HP novel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, into two movies according to this article in The Mail:

The books got progressively longer – the first, the Philosopher’s Stone, had 223 pages while Deathly Hallows has 776 – and fans have complained chunks of later novels have been left out of films.

A film source said: “There’s so much to fit that the view is the last movie should be in two halves. There is a huge battle when Harry, played by Daniel Radcliffe, takes on Voldemort that needs to be done really well.”

And Ms Rowling points out on her website: “It is simply impossible to incorporate every storyline into a film under four hours long.”

At Warner Bros, who are rumoured to be thinking of Oscars and a big-name director such as Steven Spielberg for the final film, a spokesman said:

“People are discussing all possibilities.”

I’d be up for a two-parter finale, though I don’t know if Spielberg would be my first choice for directing it. Much more interesting would be director Guillermo del Toro, who was originally picked to direct The Prisoner of Azkaban (Alfonso Cuarόn ended up directing it instead), who has said that he’d love to be able to direct the final Potter story:

“I’m definitely interested,” he insisted, “now that the movies have grown darker. They have a contrast between the gloomy existence of the kid and the world he’s exposed to. They have evolved into a really nice universe.”

At one time, Del Toro’s name was mentioned to direct the third film, The Prisoner of Azkaban, which ultimately went to his good friend Alfonso Cuarόn and is still generally recognized as tops amongst critics and adults. Back in October, he informed MTV Budapest that Deathly Hallows was more to his liking, saying “I’m up to be the one who kills twenty guys.” Well then, he gets my vote. Not only does the material play to del Toro’s strong suits, but he seems to have a genuine passion and festering vision for it.

“I got [’Deathly Hallows’] for my daughter and she was like ‘When are you going to give it to me?’” he smiled. “I read it and I was very moved by the ending. It ends very much like a Dickens novel.”

Now that sounds like someone with a real interest in directing the film and he’s certainly capable of handling the darker tone of the story.

It’s 2 A.M. and I’ve finished the last Harry Potter book.

It was excellent, but then I expected as much.

Now for some much needed sleep.

Please, no “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” spoilers.

Being as we’re away from the house today we won’t be around to start reading the latest Harry Potter book when it’s delivered from Amazon.com today. The whole family is anxiously awaiting the arrival of the books (yes, we have two coming to maintain family harmony) so I’m asking now that folks refrain from posting any plot details if you’re fortunate enough to have already gotten your copy and have a competent power company providing you with electricity.

Oops. I just found out that my mother’s copy has arrived here. It looks like Courtney will at least be getting a chance to start on the book today thanks to Grandma.

Asshat Laura Mallory loses case to ban Harry Potter…

… but she’s not done with her fight yet:

Laura Mallory, who argued the popular fiction series is an attempt to indoctrinate children in witchcraft, said she still wants the best-selling books removed and may take her case to federal court.

“I maybe need a whole new case from the ground up,” Mallory said. The woman, who said two of her four children attend public schools in the county, was not represented by an attorney at the hearing.

The ruling by Superior Judge Ronnie Batchelor upheld a decision by the Georgia Board of Education, which had supported local school officials.

You may remember Ms. Mallory from an entry I wrote about her last year in which she tried to use school shootings to justify banning Harry Potter books and reintroduce the Bible into schools.

During her day in court she tried a new tack to try and convince the judge that Harry had to go. WARNING: Your sense of irony may be over exerted from reading the next two paragraphs:

At Tuesday’s hearing, Mallory argued in part that witchcraft is a religion practiced by some people and, therefore, the books should be banned because reading them in school violates the constitutional separation of church and state.

“I have a dream that God will be welcomed back in our schools again,” Mallory said. “I think we need him.”

OK, got that? She’s all for the separation of church and state when it would keep Harry out, but she’s hoping to get God back in presumably by bringing back compulsory Bible readings as she’s advocated in the past.

Personally I’d be happy to see Ms. Mallory attempt a federal lawsuit so she can waste more time and money being slapped down one more time. Perhaps she’ll take her case all the way to the Supreme Court for the ultimate smack down. Some people just seem to need to learn things the hard way…

“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” hits store shelves July 21st.

It’s official: The last installment in the seven-part Harry Potter series has been named and a release date has been set:

The print run and number of pages have yet to be revealed, but judging from the suggested cover price, a meaty $34.99, $5 more than Potter 6, “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince,” the last book will likely match or exceed the 600-plus page length of previous releases.

“We have held the price for the past four years,” Scholastic publicist Kyle Good told The Associated Press. “In that time, costs of production, paper, trucking, gas and security—to be sure all readers can enjoy the book at the release time—have all increased.”

Many fans will pay much less for “Deathly Hallows,” with Amazon.com quickly announcing the book would be sold for $18.89, a 46 percent discount. Price competition has been so intense over the years that many retailers have acknowledged they don’t make money on the fantasy series, depending instead on customers buying other books along with Potter.

The Harry Potter is such a big hit with my family that in the past we’ve often purchased two or more copies of a book when it was released so that more than one of us could read it at a time. Word that a release date is imminent for the last book is sure to stir up excitement in this household.

Update: Not two seconds after I hit submit and an email came in from Amazon.com with details about the pre-order special.