According to the Levi’s Jeans CEO, you should never wash your jeans.

I’m a big fan of jeans. They compose nearly 90% of my wardrobe. I’m lucky enough to get to wear them to work. I’ve been wearing them for as long as I can remember.

And I’ve apparently been caring for them in entirely the wrong way…

Huh. I will often wear the same pair of jeans for a couple days in a row if it’s the weekend, but considering the amount of crap I end up getting on them regularly (e.g. food, dirt, awesomesauce, etc.) I’m not sure it’s a good idea for me to go more than a few days without tossing them in the washing machine. That said, I do seem to wear the right knee out pretty quickly as of late for reasons I cannot begin to fathom.

According to some folks at Levi’s you should just toss them in the freezer one a month to freshen them up. The official website says you should wash them infrequently and when you do wash them you should put in a lot more effort than most Americans (and this is certainly true for myself) are probably willing to commit to.

I’m not sure if I can go the never-wash-them-but-freeze-them-occasionally route anytime soon, but it’s good to know I could probably go a few days before I toss them into the washing machine.

Outrage in New Zealand over risque messages on baby clothes. (#Blogathon)

Child advocates in New Zealand have the diapers all in a bunch over a line of baby clothing with bawdy slogans on them:

The T-shirts and suits are on sale in Australian chain Cotton On Kids’ 17 Kiwi stores and feature slogans including “I’m a tits man”, “The condom broke”, “I’m living proof my mum is easy” and “Mummy likes it on top”.

Those seem pretty funny to me, but then I have a website called Stupid Evil Bastard. So what’s so wrong with those slogans?

National Council of Women of New Zealand president Elizabeth Bang agreed and said the slogans were “awful”.

“We’ve noticed more and more of this and we think it’s time it stopped. There’s quite a lot of research showing the sexualisation of children can be harmful to their mental and physical health.”

Moyna Fletcher, of anti-child abuse trust CPS, said the clothing exploits children for adults’ entertainment.

I’m not sure I buy the whole sexualisation of children argument. Of the four examples I can see the argument, maybe, with the first one, but the rest of them? I’d be more worried about the harm it would due to the self-esteem of the mother than the toddler.

Clinical psychologist April Trenberth, who works with child sex abuse victims, said the range seemed “cute” and “harmless”, but was actually “insidious and dangerous”.

Insidious and dangerous? How? The article doesn’t say. Personally I think it’s a lot of fuss over nothing, but then, as I said, that’s my kind of humor. After all the SEB Store has a “Stupid Evil Bastard In Training” toddler jumper for sale in it.

Kmart starts selling abstinence promoting pants and then lies about it.

This is pretty funny. Several blogs I read have been commenting on a new line of girl’s crop pants available at Kmart that have the slogan True Love Waits silk screened on them. People who, like me, are skeptical that a slogan on pants is going to do much to keep teens from having sex are either annoyed or, in my case, mildly amused. Conservative types, particularly those who support abstinence only sex ed, are much more enthusiastic about them.

The folks at The Buzz Blog contacted Kmart about the pants and were told that the pants weren’t meant for abstinence:

A spokeswoman for Sears Holdings Corp., which owns Kmart, told The Buzz the pants have absolutely nothing to do with taking any kind of position, either way, on abstinence. “It was not associated with any group or any cause,” said Amy Dimond. “It was just a graphic put on the pants.”

Piper & Blue, Kmart’s private label brand, designed the sweatpants as part of its summer collection that hit stores in late April.

Although the pants were not designed to make a statement, Dimond admitted that “there may be some (customers) who made the (abstinence association), but it was not the intention.”

Well, OK, except that the ad copy right on the page selling the pants says, and I quote, “Bold abstinence screen print”. I also found this customer review pretty damned amusing:

“i got these because i think the message is great and also the colors are great too but the elastic ankle cuffs are a little too small. now im worried that my chubby ankles and pro-abstinence stance are not compatible. would recommend to a friend that had smaller ankles, and also was not allergic to the yellow dye.”

Remember kids, if you have fat ankles they may be incompatible with a pro-abstinence stance. Try sitting instead. Preferably with your legs closed.

Honestly, I could give a shit if people want to sell pants with pro-abstinence messages on them. If nothing else it makes for a potentially delicious irony when some young woman wears them after getting pregnant because she didn’t bother to use any birth control. I just don’t understand why Kmart decided to offer pants with a pro-abstinence message and then felt they had to lie about it.