Too Much Faith Will Make You Crazy: Rush delivery to Heaven edition.

In Phoenix, Arizona 24-year-old mother of two Esther Callejas decided the world was too wicked for her kids and took matters into her own hands to guarantee their safety:

Phoenix mother gunned down her 2-year-old daughter and critically wounded her 6-year-old son in hopes they could “go to heaven,” police said Thursday.

Esther Callejas, 24, called her husband and other family members on Monday to say she had shot the children, Phoenix police Sgt. Ann Justus said in a statement.

Source: NBC NEws

Mom admitted to shooting the kids because, and I quote, “she wanted them to go to heaven. She told detectives she planned on killing herself after, but she was unable to reload the gun.” The two-year-old daughter didn’t survive the shooting.

Honestly, with as much as Christian leaders like to carry on about how horrible a place the Earth is and how amazingly wonderfully amazing Heaven is, I’m surprised this sort of thing doesn’t happen more often among the True Believers™. We won’t bother to mention the fact that the father of the children suspected his wife was having issues back on September 14th so he called the police to do a welfare check on them and yet he apparently left a loaded gun someplace his wife could easily get to.

But, hey, at least one of the kids made it to Heaven so at least she’s in a better place now, right? Isn’t that what Christians like to say when someone dies? Of course, that’s only if you buy into the concept of the Age of Accountability. The idea that, because babies and children are not capable of making informed decisions about whether or not to accept Jesus Christ as their savior, that God will grant them a pass and let them into Heaven if they die before reaching the Age of Accountability. Which is 13 by many people’s standards.

It’s not like God hasn’t asked for folks to kill their kids in the past. He was kidding, but still…
Source: Wikimedia

The problem, of course, is that the Bible doesn’t literally say anything about the Age of Accountability being a thing. It’s a concept some Christians came up with to answer the question of: “What happens to the babies who die before they are ever capable of accepting Jesus as their savior? Do they go to Hell? After all, all humans are born in sin.” Presumably, Hell is the fate of all people who die without accepting Jesus regardless of whether they had ever heard of him or weren’t capable of believing in him which makes God look unjust and unkind and you can’t fucking have that, now can you?

So, some folks latched on to a couple passages in the Bible that seemed to suggest that babies, at least, got a free pass. The most popular one being 2 Samuel 12:21–23. This requires some pretext. Ya see, King David fathered a child with Bathsheba after knocking off her husband and that pissed God off because God had already given David a shit ton of other pussy and his master’s house so God decides the kid has to die. God kills the kid, who hadn’t had the opportunity to commit his own sins, to punish David, who had committed the sin of Adultery even though he had added Bathsheba to his collection of wives.

Honestly, it’s not easy to follow God’s reasoning here because it’s not like David wasn’t fucking a lot of other women. He had six other wives and an untold number of concubines at the time; seemingly with God’s blessing and approval.

Anyway, King David stops fasting and praying for the kid as soon as he kicks off his mortal coil and his servants are appalled. David basically tells them there’s no point in fasting and praying once the kid is dead because God isn’t going to send him back and he’ll see him in Heaven some day anyway and, besides, he’s got a whole lot more fuckery he needs to get to. It’s not like King David didn’t have enough kids in the end anyway with something on the order of 20 or so, including four with Bathsheba. Whom he apparently got to keep even though he pissed off God by getting involved with her in the first fucking place.

The point is that a lot of Christians buy into the Age of Accountability thing based on flimsy passages like where King David says he’ll see his dead son in Heaven someday. So when one of them takes the actions that Esther Callejas did to protect her kids from Hell, it shouldn’t be too surprising. If anything, you’d think other Christians would laud her for it. You have to really love your kids to send yourself straight to Hell to make certain they get into Heaven, right? That’s some Jesus-level love right there. Except, you know, Jesus didn’t actually go to Hell in spite of some translations saying that he did. Biblically, Jesus’ suffering ended as soon as he died on the cross and that was enough to absolve mankind, blah blah blah blah blah. Whatever, it’s nonsense and fodder for a different entry.

Don’t kill your kids, folks. Even if you think they’ll go straight to Heaven. God might allow it, but the rest of us frown on that bullshit.

No, the Social Security Administration won’t call you about “suspicious activity.”

So my wife rings me up at work this morning to tell me about a strange phone call she’d just gotten. An automated voice claiming to be from the Social Security Administration was contacting her about suspicious activity involving her SSN that will result in an immediate suspension of her number if she doesn’t take steps to clear her name. The longer she listened to it the more she thought to herself, “This is bullshit,” and she hung up on the call.

She called me because there was just enough of a nagging doubt that she wanted to make sure she did the right thing. She did. It’s a scam that’s been growing since at least 2017. Here’s a recording of one of these calls:

Gotta admit that I can see how some folks would panic if they got a phone call like that one. It sounds legit enough and it doesn’t help that the scammers are spoofing the real phone number of the SSA (1-800-772-1213) on your Caller ID.

There are two basic types of these calls. One is to try and get you to “verify” your SSN by entering it into the phone so they can attempt Identity Theft. With the other type they try to get you to pay a fee by going out and buying gift cards and then reading off the codes to those cards to the scammer on the phone. This is basically the same scam as the IRS imposter scam that was making the rounds for a few years.

According to the FTC website:

In 2017, we heard from 3,200 people about SSA imposter scams, and those people reported losing nearly $210,000. So far THIS year: more than 35,000 people have reported the scam, and they tell us they’ve lost $10 million.

Source: This is what a Social Security scam sounds like – Federal Trade Commission

The page I’m quoting from was last updated in December of 2018 and it’s only gotten worse since then. From April 2018 to March 2019 the reported losses grew to $19 million.

Here’s the bit that I don’t get: How is it that folks are not recognizing this is a scam as soon as they’re told to go out and buy gift cards and then read the numbers off to the guy on the phone? How is that not a smack over the head that this is not a legit call?

I mean, I can understand falling for the request to verify your SSN because there are lots of occasions (banks, etc.) where you might be asked to do that, but who out there is so dumb to think that a government agency accepts payment by gift cards only or, worse, Bitcoin?

In an updated article about this from this past April, the FTC said:

Click to embiggen.

As the graphic shows, people reported the IRS scam (in blue) in huge numbers for many years, but the new SSA scam (in orange) is trending in the same direction – with a vengeance. People filed over 76,000 reports about Social Security imposters in the past 12 months, with reported losses of $19 million.1 Compare that to the $17 million in reported losses to the IRS scam in its peak year.2 About 36,000 reports and $6.7 million in reported losses are from the past two months alone.

Just 3.4% of people who report the Social Security scam tell us they lost money.3 Most people we hear from are just worried because they believe a scammer has their Social Security number. But when people do lose money, they lose a lot: the median individual reported loss last year was $1,500, four times higher than the median individual loss for all frauds.4 All age groups are reporting this scam in high numbers, with older and younger adults filing loss reports at similar rates.5

People report sending money in unconventional ways. Most often, people say they gave the scammer the PIN numbers on the back of gift cards. Virtual currencies like Bitcoin come in a distant second to gift cards: people say they withdrew money and fed cash into Bitcoin ATMs. With both methods, the scammer gets quick cash while staying anonymous, and the money people thought they were keeping safe is simply gone.

So let’s break a few things down:

  • No, your SSN is not about to be suspended, your bank accounts are not about to be seized, and you are not about to have an arrest warrant put out on you. This is bullshit, plain and simple.
  • The Social Security Administration will never contact you and tell you to wire them money, send cash, or (for crying out loud) give them gift cards or they’ll suspend your benefits. Never. Doesn’t happen.
  • You should never give out your SSN and/or personally identifying info to someone who has called you out of the blue even if you think it’s legit and the Called ID is the real number for whomever is calling. Hang up and call a number you know is associated with whatever you’re dealing with to make sure the request is legit first.
  • If you did do the above then go to https://www.identitytheft.gov/SSA to learn what steps you can take to protect yourself from Identity Theft.
  • Lastly, report government imposter scams to the FTC at FTC.gov/complaint. To learn more, visit ftc.gov/imposters.

As always, be vigilant. There are a lot of unscrupulous people in this world working hard to scam you out of your money. If something smells like bullshit to you then it’s probably bullshit and you should do some digging before handing over any info or money. Most importantly, remain calm. These assholes are relying on you freaking out to make it easier to get you to do something stupid. Don’t be stupid. Don’t freak out.

Someone is trying to steal my credit.

Received a letter from Credit One Bank today telling me the $435.68 payment on my credit card wouldn’t be accepted until I provided them with a letter from the bank the check was issued from on official letterhead stating that it was an authorized payment and with all this additional information to prove it was legit and in the meantime my account with Credit One was suspended.

Just one problem: I’d never heard of Credit One Bank until I got the letter today and I have never applied for a credit card from them. So, I spent the next hour on the phone with an “Account Specialist” who filed a report asking for the account to be investigated for fraud.

Turns out the account was opened on April 14th, which puts it around the same time as another attempt at opening a card with Capital One happened. That was only foiled because they used my old address in Canton instead of my current address and Capital One called to inquire about the discrepancy. I suppose I should take some comfort in that whoever this asshole opening accounts in my name is they’re at least trying to make payments on them with fraudulent checks? I’m also somewhat amused/annoyed that the amount of verification required for reactivating my “temporarily” suspended account is so much more than what is required to open the account in the first place.

Sneaky hacker graphic of Identity Theft by CafeCredit

I already knew I was part of the huge data breach of Equifax back in 2017 and I was wondering how long it would be before someone finally tried to make use of my data. I spent quite a bit more time today getting my free credit report which verifies the Credit One account having been opened and filing a dispute of it with both TransUnion and Experian. Fortunately, it doesn’t appear that any other credit cards have been successfully opened under my name. I’ve already put a freeze on my credit with Equifax, but still need to do so with the other two.

If it’s been awhile since you’ve looked at your credit report then now might be a good time to do so. You can check all three reporting agencies at once through Annual Credit Report.com which is run by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. You are entitled by law to one free credit report from each of the companies every 12 months. If you need to file a dispute you can do so online through their respective websites. You can also insure information about you is up to date. TransUnion, for example, didn’t have my current address. This is especially important if, like me, you are a victim of the Equifax breach.