Beware friends asking for emergency money via Facebook chat.

Pic of Facebook scam logo.Scammers are a clever bunch. They’re always coming up with ways to try and separate you from your cash. Lately it involves hacking Facebook accounts and then scamming friends of the victim into sending them money. The folks over at The Consumerist have two recent examples of the scam being thwarted by vigilant would-be victims:

Kevin was worried. His friend Mike said over Facebook chat that he and his wife and kids were stranded in London after getting mugged. They needed money wired immediately to settle their hotel bill. This was especially worrisome because Mike was supposed to be recuperating in the hospital from head surgery… Then Kevin realized that someone had cracked his friend’s Facebook account and was impersonating him.

If you check out both articles you’ll note that in both cases it shouldn’t be too hard to figure out that it was a scam simply from the rather amusingly bad English coming from the fake friends. Though, considering how poor some American’s typing habits are, I can see how it could be difficult to tell with some people.

Still, the scam tends to follow the same pattern. Said friend is stranded in some foreign country after having been mugged with the thief making off with their wallets and cellphones. Could you, pretty please, wire them some huge amount of money via Western Union so they can pay off their hotel bill and make their flight out of the country that’s due to leave in a couple of hours. No, they can’t call you. No, they don’t want you to send someone to pick them up. Just send them the fucking money and stop asking so many difficult questions like why it was they slept with your step-father in high school (see the first link for that amusing twist).

In short, much like the Windows operating system, Facebook has become a big enough thing that it’s now the target of criminals the world over who hope to take advantage of the trust you may have that the person claiming to be your friend really is your friend. You should always keep in mind how piss-poor most people’s password choices are and the fact that Facebook is like a sieve security-wise before rushing off to lend a hand.

2 thoughts on “Beware friends asking for emergency money via Facebook chat.

  1. I always have mixed feelings about internet scams. While they’re reprehensible and the people who perpetrate them are criminals, I also don’t feel that bad for the people that fall for them. They probably should have known better.

  2. I got one of those once, supposedly from my cousin. She lives in a rural, hick town in Ohio and has six kids. I knew full well she wouldn’t be anywhere near Europe, so I e-mailed her and let her know that someone had hacked into her facebook account. Even if it had been one of my world-traveling friends, I would have called them before giving them any money.

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