Idiot mayor thinks baggy pants problem is “bigger than the Constitution.”

You’ve really gotta love it when some asshole who thinks he can do whatever he wants gets elected to office. Assholes like Mayor Frank Melton of Jackson, Mississippi who has taken it upon himself to pull up the pants of Jackson’s youth:

The council members who voted against the saggy-pants ban said it likely was unconstitutional.

But Mayor Frank Melton, who joined the council meeting via telephone from Texas, said he will issue an executive order instituting the dress code.

“I certainly respect the Constitution,” Melton said, “but we have some issues that are much bigger than the Constitution.”

I think the saggy-pants fad is pretty silly myself, but to say it’s bigger than the Constitution is idiotic in the extreme. Does it ever occur to these morons that part of the reason people wear their pants like that is because it pisses off the establishment?

Melton said his executive order will not call on offenders to be put in jail. Instead, he said he envisions police officers taking young men with sagging pants home to their parents to talk about the problem.

Well that’s one way to waste the valuable time and resources of your police department. Up next he’ll have the police washing your mouth out with soap and water if they catch you cussin’.

“I am willing to go to court on this particular issue,” said Melton…

Because I’m a dumbass. But not as big a dumbass as the people who voted me into office!

13 thoughts on “Idiot mayor thinks baggy pants problem is “bigger than the Constitution.”

  1. Yeah?  Well the really big criminals, like Madoff, Rumsfeld, Bush, Cheney, Ebbers, Fastow… they all wear neckties.  Maybe if you see a kid wearing a necktie, you should haul them back to their parents and have a talk with them, before it’s too late.

    You know, to save as many children as we can.

  2. I would love to see millions of people in Jackson wear baggy pants in protest….and that includes Police Officers.

  3. I am curious about this taking the offenders home to talk with their parents bit.  Are low riding pants a exfashion statement once one moves out of the parents’ house?

    I recently made a few dietary changes which have dropped nearly two sizes off my waistline.  My drawers have been exposed now and then when wearing older pants.  Do my parents really need a talk with a police officer about the fashion choices of their thirty-eight year old son?

  4. My son’s trackie bottoms fit, but he is stubborn when it comes to new clothes.  What does he think about holes in the knees or Fleece jackets that are a bit ragged. (Some shapping Malls ban hoodie tops on the basis of the antisocial behaviour associated with them).

  5. The whole pants sagging to expose half your ass started in jails and lockups (no belts that you could use to hang yourself).

    The inmates/arrestees who wore their pants the lowest were actually the most open to (homo)sexual invitation.

    If they want to ostracize the sagging pants wearers, just mock their sexual orientation.  Odds are they’re anti-homosexual bigots and it’ll be an effective way of getting under their skin (“You’re just ready to get fucked in the ass, aren’t you?”).

    I’m also not sure why these proposed bans are getting so much press.  Take a gander through just about any city’s municipal codebook, you’ll probably find plenty of ordinances of questionable constitutionality that only haven’t been challenged because the maximum penalty is a fine of some sort.

  6. Benior wrote:
    The whole pants sagging to expose half your ass started in jails and lockups (no belts that you could use to hang yourself).

    The inmates/arrestees who wore their pants the lowest were actually the most open to (homo)sexual invitation.

    Nope!  Try again.

  7. “Idiot mayor thinks baggy pants problem is “bigger than the Constitution.”

    Well, looking at the photo in Wikipedia Commons, the Constitution, while looking pretty large (or maybe the handwriting is just really small), does indeed seem a bit smaller than your average set of saggy pants. Therefore, he is not wrong or an asshole. Just misunderstood and a bit fixated on comparing sizes of pants to old paper documents.

  8. Melton said his executive order will not call on offenders to be put in jail. Instead, he said he envisions police officers taking young men with sagging pants home to their parents to talk about the problem.

    I’d like to know what will happen to the “perpetrator” if, after the police have their “talk about the problem” the parents say “We do not consider this a problem.  We appreciate your concern, but we think you happen to be missing your brains.”

    If he’s not talking about punishment, then what he’s doing is worse than useless.  If he is talking about punishment, then he’s lying to us about not talking about jail time, because if he’s talking about a fine and you don’t think you should have to pay it, the alternative will eventually be jail time.

    Benior:
    I’m also not sure why these proposed bans are getting so much press.  Take a gander through just about any city’s municipal codebook, you’ll probably find plenty of ordinances of questionable constitutionality that only haven’t been challenged because the maximum penalty is a fine of some sort.

    Because most of the time the bone-head mayor doesn’t threaten an executive order to write the ban/regulation on the books after the council votes it down.  He obviously has not read the Conservative manual: “Passing Questionable Regulation for Dummies”

  9. I see a marketing opportunity for some enterprising individual in Jackson. Print up T-shirts, etc., proclaiming: “I’ve got something in my pants that’s bigger than your Constitution.”

  10. I’d like to know what will happen to the “perpetrator” if, after the police have their “talk about the problem” the parents say “We do not consider this a problem.  We appreciate your concern, but we think you happen to be missing your brains.”

    Oh my, I hadn’t thought of that.  If some cop showed up to “give me a talk” about my son’s atire I’d be facing a number of quandaries.  Would I be opening up my son or myself to harassment if I told him the truth that this was complete BS?  How far would the harassment go, and what form would it take?

    A school administrator once called to tell me that my son had made an offensive poster in art class.  It was a work of satire making fun of racists, rather cleverly done, I thought, but the administrator was too stupid to understand it.  The same guy called me about one of my other sons who made a film in Spanish class which, when translated, was about vampire drug lords.  Cops can, if they choose, be considerably more than an administrative annoyance when they decide to harass.

  11. I don’t know why the police would even want to enforce that ordinance.  There is nothing funnier than chasing a suspect who is wearing baggy pants and having them drop around their ankles.  I’m usually laughing so hard I can hardly place the handcuffs on the bad guy.

  12. Berzerk: A breath of fresh air in an otherwise stifling office full of smoke! I am reminded of the letter a father wrote to his friend, bemoaning his kids and the younger generation – “. . .they wear their hear long, listen to strange music, stay up all hours of the night, etc. . . ” The letter is dated 360BC, in Greek. We haven’t changed!

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