A medical use for Marijuana that may be too important to ignore.

One of the bigger problems we’re beginning to face is the rise of drug resistant bacteria thanks to an overuse of antibioctics. MRSA is a particularly nasty bug that has been increasingly causing problems around the world and may be a sign of things to come. Now new research seems to indicate that Marijuana may be useful in killing it:

Researchers in Italy and the U.K. tested five major marijuana chemicals called cannabinoids on different strains of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). All five showed germ-killing activity against the MRSA strains in lab tests. Some synthetic cannabinoids also showed germ-killing capability. The scientists note the cannabinoids kill bacteria in a different way than traditional antibiotics, meaning they might be able to bypass bacterial resistance.

At least two of the cannabinoids don’t have mood-altering effects, so there could be a way to use these substances without creating the high of marijuana.

[…] In the study, published in the Journal of Natural Products, researchers call for further study of the antibacterial uses of marijuana. There are “currently considerable challenges with the treatment of infections caused by strains of clinically relevant bacteria that show multi-drug resistance,” the researchers write. New antibacterials are urgently needed, but only one new class of antibacterial has been introduced in the last 30 years. “Plants are still a substantially untapped source of antimicrobial agents,” the researchers conclude.

If the study is backed up by further replications then weed may finally have a reason to be at least partially legalized, though the form of any drugs created from it would probably not be such that you’d smoke it. Just the same there are laws that would have to be repealed in order to move forward with it as a medical treatment. Considering the threat posed by MRSA this is a welcome discovery indeed.

10 thoughts on “A medical use for Marijuana that may be too important to ignore.

  1. It still seems to be early research, so it’s going to be some time before cannabinoids might actually used as antibiotics against SA and other bacteria.  Also the article wasn’t very clear on how effective they actually are.

    Still, it’s the prevalence of antibiotics in low doses that’s causing bacterial resistance in the first place, so if the use of cannabis was more wide spread, cannabinoid resistant strains of SA might be common.

  2. So Flaky, what you’re saying is that we should either refrain altogether, or make sure we get zonked out of our minds?

  3. Zilch: That would be refraining, because I doubt that any amount of smoking would deliver enough of the stuff to the bacteria to kill them all anyway, if it makes any difference at all. My guess is that if cannabinoids are useful as antibiotics, they need to be delivered in much higher doses than what you get from smoking pot. But in any case I’m just guessing here, I’d really need to read the study to know more.

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