ArsTechnica posts part 6 of “The History of the Amiga.”

It’s been awhile since the last installment, but it’s still a worthwhile read. They pick up on the history of my all-time favorite computer with Commodore’s attempt to stop bleeding money all over the place:

A history of the Amiga, part 6: stopping the bleeding.

When a corporation is bleeding money, often the only way to save it is to drastically lower fixed expenses by firing staff. Commodore had lost over $300 million between September 1985 and March 1986, and over $21 million in March alone. Commodore’s new CEO, Thomas Rattigan, was determined to stop the bleeding.

Rattigan began three separate rounds of layoffs. The first to go were the layabouts, people who hadn’t proven their worth to the company and were never likely to. The second round coincided with the cancellation of many internal projects. The last round was necessary for the company to regain profitability, but affected many good people and ultimately may have hurt the company in the long run. Engineer Dave Haynie recalled that the first round was actually a good thing, the second was of debatable value, and the last was “hitting bone.”

Good stuff. Go check it out.

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