A timeline of the Bush Administration’s assault on the Bill of Rights.

I’ve ranted on many occasions about the slow but relentless assault on the Bill of Rights that the Bush Administration has been engaged in since they came into office, but even I was shocked when I read MonoGlobo’s Bill of Rights: A Timeline. Here’s a couple of examples:

October

The USA Patriot Act becomes law. Among other things the law: makes it a crime for anyone to contribute money or material support for any group on the State Department’s Terror Watch List, allows the FBI to monitor and tape conversations between attorneys and clients, allows the FBI to order librarians to turn over information about patron’s reading habits, allows the government to conduct surveillance on internet and email use of US citizens without notice. The act also calls for expanded use of National Security Letters (NSLs), which allow the FBI to search telephone, email and financial records of US citizens without a court order, exempts the government from needing to reveal how evidence against suspected terrorists was obtained and authorizes indefinite detention of immigrants at the discretion of law enforcement and immigration authorities.

NJ Superior court judge and civil liberties scholar Anthony Napolitano, author of A Nation of Sheep, has described the law’s assault on first and fourth amendment principles as follows, “The Patriot Act’s two most principle constitutional errors are an assault on the Fourth Amendment, and on the First. It permits federal agents to write their own search warrants [under the name “national security letters”] with no judge having examined evidence and agreed that it’s likely that the person or thing the government wants to search will reveal evidence of a crime… Not only that, but the Patriot Act makes it a felony for the recipient of a self-written search warrant to reveal it to anyone. The Patriot Act allows [agents] to serve self-written search warrants on financial institutions, and the Intelligence Authorization Act of 2004 in Orwellian language defines that to include in addition to banks, also delis, bodegas, restaurants, hotels, doctors’ offices, lawyers’ offices, telecoms, HMOs, hospitals, casinos, jewelry dealers, automobile dealers, boat dealers, and that great financial institution to which we all would repose our fortunes, the post office. Link 1 | Link 2

November

Executive order limits release of presidential documents. The order gives incumbent presidents the right to veto requests to open any past presidential records and supercedes the congressionally passed law of 1978 mandating release of all presidential records not explicitly deemed classified. Link

Seeing the entire list is sobering to say the least and a reminder of the damage to our civil liberties inflicted by the current administration. It may be years before any of it can be undone and much of it may be lost altogether. Politicians and governments are often less than enthusiastic to give back rights they’ve taken away.

3 thoughts on “A timeline of the Bush Administration’s assault on the Bill of Rights.

  1. Seeing the entire list is sobering to say the least and a reminder of the damage to our civil liberties inflicted by the current administration.

    Oh come on now, as Bill O’Really (probably) shouted at someone on his show: “What freedoms are being restricted!?!?!  I don’t have anything to hide!!!  Why do you love terrorism!?!?!?  Gaaaaaaahhhhaa….CUT HIS MIC!!!!!! (commence drooling and ape-like scratching of armpits as camera cuts to commercial.)”

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