Kentucky Governor orders Ten Commandments put in state capitol to win votes.

How can anyone not see this as a blatant attempt at pandering for votes?

FRANKFORT, Ky.—Gov. Ernie Fletcher plans to put the Ten Commandments and other historical documents in the Capitol on the day before Kentucky’s general election.

The action comes on the heels of a ruling by U.S. District Judge Joseph M. Hood that a previous injunction in a separate court case doesn’t apply to the display Fletcher wants placed in the Capitol Rotunda.

Fletcher attorney David Fleenor said the governor would issue an executive order Monday directing that the Ten Commandments be displayed alongside other historical documents including the Magna Carta, Mayflower Compact and the Declaration of Independence.

Voters will choose Tuesday between the incumbent Republican and his Democratic challenger Steve Beshear, who polls show commands a double-digit lead in the gubernatorial race.

It’ll be truly a sad day if this is all it takes to keep this asshat in office.

27 thoughts on “Kentucky Governor orders Ten Commandments put in state capitol to win votes.

  1. How can anyone not see this as a blatant attempt at pandering for votes?

    that is pretty much what i thought when i heard about this on the local news. it won’t change my mind as i decided long ago to vote for breshear.

    and if anyone is wondering why the phrase “KY Gov. Ernie Fletcher” rings a little bell in their head, he was almost shot down by F-16’s on his way to D.C. for ronald reagan’s funeral when the transponder on his plane failed.

    l8r

  2. and if anyone is wondering why the phrase “KY Gov. Ernie Fletcher” rings a little bell in their head, he was almost shot down by F-16’s on his way to D.C. for ronald reagan’s funeral when the transponder on his plane failed.

    We (meaning those of us who have no real love of the Dubya wannabe)were understandably dismayed upon hearing that the “Shoot First and Ask Questions Later” rule had been over-ruled. But with any luck we’ll have the fucker gone by tomorrow evening.

  3. I trust that the TC order is the last fistful of wet straw that this theocratic b@$+@rd takes to the bottom with him.  Hopefully the people of Kentucky will see through this pathetic gesture and leave a large, red, stinging screen door print on this @#$%^&‘s @$$ today.  Best of luck to you and your state, parkay and Bastich.

  4. after putting on my paranoia hat and thinking about this a little more, ernie’s executive order may have more to do with the next governors race than this one.

    if breshear reverses ernie’s executive order, he will be attacked for removing the ten commandments from the capitol.

    if breshear waits until legal action is brought against the state and then removes the display, he will be attacked for caving in to the aclu as well as removing the ten commandments from the capitol.

    breshear’s only other recourse would be to fight the legal battle, pissing away lots of money in a action that is bound to fail.

    cubiclegrrl wrote:
    Hopefully the people of Kentucky will see through this pathetic gesture

    i wouldn’t count on that. we keep re-electing mitch mcconnell and jim bunning to the us senate. we even send democrats to the house of representatives who vote for bush’s policies like the military commissions act.

  5. Ever the optimist, arn’cha’, parkay?  wink  I’m from a so-called Blue State and we repeatedly send complete mouth-breathers to the statehouse, I’m sorry to report. 

    I wouldn’t worry too much about 2012, though—the Religious Right will still be licking its wounds.  I highly doubt that we’ve seen the end of the Haggard-Foley-Vitter-Allen-Prevett-Craig scandals.  Loud professions of faith are, I think, well on their way to becoming synonymous with hypocrisy and hidden vices in the public mind. 

    I’m just sorry that the ORU scandal—with all the juicy “Mrs. Roberts-on” details—didn’t get more traction a month ago.  That would have been more or less the coup-de-grace for this uptick in Dominionist ambitions.

  6. IIRC Fletcher had a judge rule that as long as the other documents were in place the TC display was appropriate. My opinion, for what it’s worth, is he’s just playing a last second grab for votes. Thanks cubiclegrrl and Webs for the well wishes.

    Now, off to the vote and then to the job.  confused

  7. Magna Carta, Mayflower Compact and the Declaration of Independence.

    I’ve seen the Magna Carta- I’d be surprised if it’s left the British Museum. I’m assuming these are copies cheese

    if breshear reverses ernie’s executive order, he will be attacked for removing the ten commandments from the capitol.
    if breshear waits until legal action is brought against the state and then removes the display, he will be attacked for caving in to the aclu as well as removing the ten commandments from the capitol.

    COurse he could try and get clever, and put the Koran in, maybe something fromotehr philosophies too- dilute the Christianity, claim it’s a historical exhibition for education. If he gets tacit approval from the ACLU, all his opponents can do is complain that he isn’t promoting Christianity. “But that would be against the law- are you asking me to break the law?”

  8. Les: It’ll be truly a sad day if this is all it takes to keep this asshat in office.

    Though it may be an event we are not able to prevent, change can only happen through work on the ground. I think we’re doing the right thing to fight organised religion on SEB, because i don’t want to see arbitary power given to arbitary rules, that’s oppresive without any benefit in real terms

  9. cubiclegrrl wrote:
    Ever the optimist, arn’cha’

    just because you’re paranoid it doesn’t mean they aren’t out to get you. cool smirk

    l8r

  10. Last_Hussar wrote:
    he could try and get clever, and put the Koran in…something from other philosophies to dilute the Christianity

    not likely, we are talking about kentucky here. the mainstream democrats are quite conservative and christian around these parts.

  11. I’ve seen the Magna Carta- I’d be surprised if it’s left the British Museum. I’m assuming these are copies.

    Actually, there are a number of copies:  The English Barons made bad ol’ King John sign a few of ‘em—just in case His Majesty might, say, “accidentally” lose one, y’understand…  Plus his son and grandson were required to sign fresh copies when they took their turns on the throne.  One from King Eddy Longshanks’s era (remember the evil old king in “Braveheart”?) is on display at the Library of Congress.  It’s in phenomenally good shape, for all that it was written some 500 years before the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.  Worth seeing, at least to a history nerd like myself…

  12. and with 75% OF PRECINCTS REPORTING in :

    Steve Beshear (D) 466,786 59%

    Ernie Fletcher (R) 316,141 40%

    Steve Beshear has been projected to be the next governor of kentucky.

    when leaving his polling location today, reporters asked beshear what he planned to do about ernie’s executive order. beshear indicated that he would take whatever action was required by the court system.

  13. Going to work – Nerve grating

    Dealing with people who don’t remember it’s election day and they can’t buy alcohol till the polls close – Irritating

    Hearing a local newsie call the Gubernatorial election a spanking – Priceless!!!  LOL

  14. Bastich:  Please tell me you’re kidding about the alcohol thing…  In any case, congratulations!  Long live the reality-based revolution.

  15. I kid you not, ma’am. Here is the actual law from KRS Title X Chapter 119….

    119.215 Providing another with intoxicants on election day.
    Any person who sells, loans, gives or furnishes intoxicating liquor to any person in this
    state on the day of any regular or primary election, under circumstances not constituting a
    violation of KRS 242.100, 244.290 or 244.480, shall be fined not less than twenty-five
    dollars ($25) nor more than fifty dollars ($50) for each offense.
    History: Created 1974 Ky. Acts ch. 130, sec. 82.

    If I had a dime for every time I told someone (in some cases more than once) that they couldn’t buy I’d take all of you with me to someplace much warmer for the winter.  wink

  16. 119.215 Providing another with intoxicants on election day.  Any person who sells, loans, gives or furnishes intoxicating liquor to any person in this state on the day of any regular or primary election, under circumstances not constituting a violation of KRS 242.100, 244.290 or 244.480, shall be fined not less than twenty-five dollars ($25) nor more than fifty dollars ($50) for each offense.  History: Created 1974 Ky. Acts ch. 130, sec. 82.

    Wow.  I’m just freaked.  And I thought that Minnesota was puritanical for not allowing anyone except the bars to sell booze on Sunday…  Yikes.

  17. Hmm, I’m not sure I understand the reasoning behind that law. Then again I’m not sure I would be able to comprehend the reasoning behind many state laws.

  18. cubiclegrrl- yes, there is something special about original documents, isn’t there?  Here in Vienna, if you have a good enough reason, you can go to the Nationalbibliothek and be handed, say, a fourteenth-century manuscript of Minnelieder.  For me as a medieval musician, it’s an amazing feeling to hold a piece of music written seven hundred years ago, and sing it (softly, of course: you’re in a library after all…)

  19. Hmm, I’m not sure I understand the reasoning behind that law. Then again I’m not sure I would be able to comprehend the reasoning behind many state laws.

    Here’s a mind warper for you then, here in Kentucky the Peace Officer Oath of Office makes you promise you’ve never been in or helped with a duel! Before anyone calls bullshit I worked in a county lock-up for a year as a Deputy and had to take that very oath.

    Yes, I cracked up in case anyone is wondering.

  20. Webs wrote:
    Hmm, I’m not sure I understand the reasoning behind that law. Then again I’m not sure I would be able to comprehend the reasoning behind many state laws.

    i have two guesses on that matter.

    1) closing the bars increases the likelyhood of citizens going to the polls to vote.

    2) alcohol could be used as payment for vote buying.

    i tend to believe that #2 is the more likely reason.

    fyi, here in lexington, it is illegal to have an ice cream cone in your back pocket. it sounds stupid but it is a very old law. apparently, horses like ice cream and you can get a horse to follow you to someplace where you can steal it in private.

    Bastich wrote:
    here in Kentucky the Peace Officer Oath of Office makes you promise you’ve never been in or helped with a duel!

    not being involved in a duel with deadly weapons is also a big part of the oath taken by the governor elect when he/she is sworn into office.

    Kentucky Constitution of 1850, the governor’s oath of office

    “ I do solemnly swear that I will support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of this Commonwealth, and be faithful and true to the Commonwealth of Kentucky so long as I continue to be a citizen thereof, and that I will faithfully execute, to the best of my ability, the office of Governor according to law; and I do further solemnly swear that since the adoption of the present Constitution, I, being a citizen of this state, have not fought a duel with deadly weapons within this state, nor out of it, nor have I sent or accepted a challenge to fight a duel with deadly weapons, nor have I acted as second in carrying a challenge, nor aided or assisted any person thus offending, so help me God.”

  21. 1) closing the bars increases the likelyhood of citizens going to the polls to vote.

    Except no bars are being closed. They just can’t sell, furnish, or loan alcohol.

    2) alcohol could be used as payment for vote buying.

    So could money, tobacco, and many other things. But banning alcohol on a voting day isn’t going to stop much. I bet the only thing it does is increase sales of alcohol before and after that day.

    not being involved in a duel with deadly weapons is also a big part of the oath taken by the governor elect when he/she is sworn into office.

    It’s interesting to hear about the silly things states have. Thanks parkay.

    it sounds stupid but it is a very old law.

    Which is where most of the stupid laws come from. Some person many years back thought it would be a good idea to legislate x, where x is something that pisses them off. It gets written into law and over time loses its purpose.

  22. Webs wrote
    Except no bars are being closed. They just can’t sell, furnish, or loan alcohol

    Which is the whole point of a bar, to sell alcohol. No sales equals no reason to be open. No argument from me that it’s stupid but it is the law for now and that’s what we have to go by.

  23. yes, there is something special about original documents, isn’t there?  Here in Vienna, if you have a good enough reason, you can go to the Nationalbibliothek and be handed, say, a fourteenth-century manuscript of Minnelieder.  For me as a medieval musician, it’s an amazing feeling to hold a piece of music written seven hundred years ago, and sing it (softly, of course: you’re in a library after all…)

    That is soooo uber-cool.  And I’m envious.  I’m not a musician by any stretch, but I can certainly understand the sentiment.  Just seeing a score edited in Beethoven’s own hand at the British Library was one heck of a charge—and that manuscript was maybe 200 years old.  Among many other similar happy moments there—that stuff’s like candy for me.  I envy your proximity to such treasures.

  24. Many of the bars where I’m from would likely still be open if they couldn’t sell alcohol. Many would still make money from food and non-alcohol drink sales. One bar in particular has the best wings in town. I have only sat and got a drink from it one time, but have ordered many wings.

    Also, a lot of the bars in this area have illegal gambling with the poker machines. You put in money, and if you win the bar pays out. The bar owner splits the revenue of the machine with the gaming company that puts the machine in the bar. These poker machines alone would likely be reason enough to keep the bar open.

  25. They just can’t sell, furnish, or loan alcohol

    surely you only ever hire booze anyway!

    there is something special about original documents, isn’t there?

    I won’t boats about my behind the scenes tour of the British Museum “Oh that 1000 year old sword I got to handle”…

  26. I’m pretty sure Parkay is on the right path with the theory that the law banning alcohol sales while polls are open is to prevent vote buying with booze.

    I can’t cite a source off top of my head, but I’m sure I’ve read something in American history where votes were bought with free beer or other alcohol.

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