My how times have changed. One Gigabyte: Then and Now

A small reminder of how far we’ve come in our storage media. Below is a picture of an old 1 Gigabyte Hard Drive from around 20 years ago compared to a 1 Gigabyte Flash RAM card from today:


Click to embiggen!

And, yes, I know my last few posts have all been pictures or videos, but my brain is barely working at the moment and I though these were pretty cool. So there.

Found via Gismodo.

9 thoughts on “My how times have changed. One Gigabyte: Then and Now

  1. just as scarry, you can get a 8gig sd card, thats big enough to hold an entire full length movie (at normal resolution) and all the special features… on an object the size of a postage stamp

  2. Dof- the USB drive looks intriguing.  I especially liked this test:

    10 minutes in the right claw of a rock crab…no damage except to my own left digit

    Now, I’m willing to bet that my band saw could do it some serious damage.  But although I have put a USB drive through the washer (some rust, still works) I can’t see a plausible scenario for accidentally sawing one in half.

  3. Wow, if that center cylinder is about the size of the platters for that hard drive thats insane.  It’s like the laserdisc of hard drives.

    …any guesses what the RPM’s on that drive are?  It’s big enough that you’d think it would have to be bolted down or on spin up it would just run away from you.

  4. Wow, if that center cylinder is about the size of the platters for that hard drive thats insane.  It’s like the laserdisc of hard drives.

    …any guesses what the RPM’s on that drive are?  It’s big enough that you’d think it would have to be bolted down or on spin up it would just run away from you.

    The outer case of the drive is transparent: the brown-colored disks are the platters. 

    I don’t know the RPM’s but a grumpy old friend of mine worked on earlier drives and said that once in a while there’d be a crash and the head would go flying.  That was on drives that weren’t enclosed and the head would go ricocheting across the room.  For that reason, and because it was easier to keep the platter enclosure dust-free than the entire room, they started enclosing the platters like this.

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