Internet Explorer 7 final now available. First vulnerablity already discovered.

It’s offficial. You can now download Internet Explorer 7 Final.

And less than 24 hours after its release, the first security flaw has been found.

Enjoy!

25 thoughts on “Internet Explorer 7 final now available. First vulnerablity already discovered.

  1. And less than 24 hours after its release, the first security flaw has been found.

    Why does this not surprise me?  Maybe I will download it though, for the rare chance I use IE tabs would be nice.

  2. I think the biggest flaw is how FUGLY IE 7 is. And it doesn’t even have the standard file|edit|etc. menu bar turned on by default!!

  3. I mean just look at how bizarre this thing is and how Microsoft shits all over their own UI guidelines.

    fuglyht5.th.jpg

  4. I am installing it manually on my users’ computers because it will soon be a “Windows update” installed automatically.  Given the likelihood of it screwing up my users’ machine (it is deeply threaded in the operating system where no web browser has any business ever being, and actually requires a friggin’ restart to install) I do not want to risk inconveniencing my users if it happens while I’m not around.

    Once it’s installed, it shouldn’t do too much damage; they all use Firefox.

  5. Once nice feature that I have found is when I have IE disabled (via Set Program Access and Defaults) and I type a url into the Windows Explorer location box, it opens the page in Firefox instead of turning that Windows Explorer window into an IE window.

  6. Webs, I’ve got it installed because I have to know how to support it for when the company I’m working for decides to move up to it. Plus it helps when working on new layouts to see how it looks in multiple browsers.

    K. Engels, the new layout is well within Microsoft’s UI guidelines… for Windows Vista. Sure it looks ugly under XP, but it’s not bad when used inside of Vista.

  7. see, this is why I stick with Firefox, IE has never been anything but trouble. If only so many websites weren’t built to only be seen in IE….  mad

  8. That picture looks fine to me, except for the menacing demon in the window, that made me jump… LOL

    Actually Les, that’s is a very excellent point.  I guess even though I hate it, it is important for me to be up on the latest MS software.

    As far as the page looking differently in different browsers, if your page is validated for proper HTML, then it should look fine in any browser.

  9. it will soon be a “Windows update” installed automatically.  Given the likelihood of it screwing up my users’ machine (it is deeply threaded in the operating system where no web browser has any business ever being, and actually requires a friggin’ restart to install)

    Yeah, you remind of something similar. At work, we use XP. And every now and then, when I break for a cuppa tea, I get back to my room and lo and behold, my computer has restarted itself for an autoupdate.

    Sure, I have never LOST anything (that I know of, hhhhumm, though there were a few things there and then…) but sometimes the kind of windows I have open is a sort of information as well (on what tasks I have to do etc….)

    As it is, I hate it. Has no business doing that. Should turn it off, really, but I don’t know if I can. Will have to find out…

  10. Should turn it off, really, but I don’t know if I can. Will have to find out…

    Thing is, you need the patch.  But the auto-restart is really a pill.  At work we had a classroom computer restart in the middle of a PowerPoint presentation!

    (Of course, a motion to shut off PowerPoint is always in order. )

    Macs don’t appeal to me – just a style issue, I guess.  I am a big fan of ThinkPads.  Just loaded Linux on one and am experimenting with it.  We are a three-ThinkPad household.

  11. Peoples dislike of IE is over blown. I’m never convinced what all the fuss is about!.. you don’t want it? Don’t use it. But don’t herald firefox, its rife with its own problems from a support point of view.

  12. I don’t think it’s overblown. I think Microsoft brought it upon themselves by dropping all browser development for a couple of years thinking they didn’t need to improve it anymore.

    It’s certainly true that Firefox has it’s own share of problems, but I’ve been doing support for a long time and IE is consistently more of a support headache than Firefox is. It also doesn’t help that fixes for Firefox are deployed quite a bit faster than IE as well. Above and beyond those two things, however, Firefox introduced some important advances to how people browse the web with tabbed browsing just being one of the big ones.

    This is coming from someone who used to use IE exclusively simply because of the convenience of it being built-in and it took quite awhile before I made the jump to Firefox. I even wrote an entry about why I was finally giving up IE in favor of Firefox back in December of 2003.

  13. Maybe its just me. I’ve never had a problem with IE. I tried Firefox but I just found it too clunky, and now I’m supporting a development environment its usually firefox users (who are “responsible” for their own machines) who cause me the most problems at the desktop level.

    I guess its just what experience leaves. Six of one, half a dozen of the other.

  14. Six of one, half a dozen of the other.

    Ahh, the essence of being “Fair and balanced™”. 

    I have a couple of beefs with IE.  One is the development cycle – they beat Netscape and then stopped.  Nothing is harder on your laurels than resting on them.  The functionality of Firefox when doing searches or working among several sites at once, plus the multi-search tool, was just too time-saving to ignore. Plus, you can add modules to build your own Firefox.

    Another is simply that IE is deeply threaded into the operating system.  The web browser connects to other, strange computers – it should be as isolated from the operating system as possible and still maintain functionality.  Hell, it should run in a VM if possible.  But that wasn’t the end of it; ‘ActiveX’ practically bent your machine over for any passing bit of malware or annoyanceware.  The big innovation in IE now?  ActiveX is a little bit crippled, but IE is still deep in the OS.

    And when people started abandoning IE for Firefox, what did they do?  Copied most of Firefox’s features.  How innovative. Even so, the installation takes 5 minutes instead of 30 seconds, and requires a restart.  IE7 is a huge application.

    So I do herald Firefox – even now it is a superior competitive product, and even more importantly, it adheres to industry standards.

  15. Another is simply that IE is deeply threaded into the operating system.  The web browser connects to other, strange computers – it should be as isolated from the operating system as possible and still maintain functionality.  Hell, it should run in a VM if possible.  But that wasn’t the end of it; ‘ActiveX’ practically bent your machine over for any passing bit of malware or annoyanceware.  The big innovation in IE now?  ActiveX is a little bit crippled, but IE is still deep in the OS.

    I think DOF hit the nail on the coffin here.  There is no explanation anyone, including MS, can give that would adequately explain why IE is threaded directly into the Kernel.  That is the most idiotic thing you can do ever with any piece of software.  Why do you think rootkit made all that noise last year?

    the installation takes 5 minutes instead of 30 seconds

    Man you are lucky.  I just built a new system using DDR2 800 memory, and incredibly fast parts and it still took me at least 10 minutes to install.  I gave up waiting after 3, since I was used to Firefox which takes about 1 minute at most.

    Maybe its just me. I’ve never had a problem with IE.

    I think this sums it all up.  The most important thing is to use what works for you.  I can spout Linux propaganda and importance of it’s use all day long, but at the end of the day, people need to use what works for them.

    What I can say for a fact is that I have yet to work a single IT job, and I am working on my fourth, where IE did not give me any trouble.  I can’t tell you how many times I lost research due to and IE crash.  And I can’t tell you how many hours I have wasted trying to explain to pissed off end users as to why their browser would crash on them when all they are doing is a simple Google search and typing up a document in the background.

  16. I’m wondering. Do any of you experience problems running IE and Google Desktop? I just installed GD- and now IE keeps hanging.

    Crap!

  17. Well, I downloaded IE 7.1 and wish I hadn’t.
    I can’t see any immediate advantages.
    And the disadvantages – for starters the flag next to our names in SEB have disappeared or did that change because of something else.
    Ah well; something else to get used to, I suppose – and that can’t be a bad thing, can it? wink

  18. LJ, the flags disappearing is my doing. I’m trying to lighten the load in the template to get the out of memory errors to stop.

  19. Removing the flags sped up things on my end. At first i thought the proxies were screwing me. But now things are definitely much faster.

    Please: don’t remove the avatars. wink

  20. We got quite a bit of referrer spam yesterday and I think the memory issues may have been, in part, from the extra traffic. Once we got into the evening hours I wasn’t noticing as many memory errors and this morning I’ve not seen one. The flags were nice, but it was a huge mod so probably not worth the resources it ate up.

    I’ll be keeping an eye on it to see how things go.

  21. I work for Dell doing tech support and i handle most of my calls for IE crashing systems and causing no internet connectivity.

    If you use any toolbars take caution and remove them before installing IE7 if you must.  I personally say if its not broke, or too much with IE6, then don’t change it.  Download firefox!

    Firefox is so higly looked at because it uses alot less resources and like previously mentioned doesn’t root deeply into the OS.  The other great thing about it is that you have people all over the world working on it so anyone can find a bug and fix it.  Microsoft looks on their own and obviously still doesn’t fix all the issues.

  22. Might I suggest Opera or Mozilla Firefox?

    I have disabled Internet Explorer by clearing the Execute permissions on the “%PROGRAMFILES%\Internet Explorer” and “%PROGRAMFILES%\Outlook Express” folders.

    Above all this, I have enfofced a software restriction policy (using secpol.msc) to block those two paths, and set it up so that all files are blocked from being executed; not just EXE files.

    I have built a “mini Internet Explorer” which asks whether you started it or not, and the URL is typed from the command line. This allows me to get basic Microsoft Updates.

  23. I forgot to mention that Opera 10 also works under Windows NT Workstation 4.0 albeit the images on the buttons and images on some websites appear upside down.

    But Opera under Windows NT Workstation 4.0 passes the Acid Tests (Acid1, Acid2, Acid3) with at least 16777216 Flying Colors!

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