Open Thread: The War on Drugs.  Socialism in South America.  What does it mean for North America?

    Last night the CBC ran a brief news documentary on Bolivia’s recent events.  It is backed up with significant reporting on the website covering the socio-economic issues. 

    The poor produce cocoa which they have eaten as a dietary suplement for 1000 years, the rich live in the east and are modernising due to resource wealth (Oil and Gas).  A popularist indiginous president, Evo Morales has been democratically elected on a socialist platform trying to balance it all.

http://www.cbc.ca/correspondent/060514.html

  Will this influence a change in poilicy for North American governments in dealing with drugs and South American poverty?

  Can the Morales Presidency find common ground with the U.S. government?

   

4 thoughts on “Open Thread: The War on Drugs.  Socialism in South America.  What does it mean for North America?

  1. Subsrcibing…  but no, it will not have an impact on the US government.  Instead our country will do everything in our power to make the Bolivians look like assholes, and speak out against their government.

  2. LK: Can the Morales Presidency find common ground with the U.S. government?

    Not if he wants to do the ‘right thing’ by his people.
    The US has too much money and psychological programming invested in their prohibition of taboo drugs.
    Poor Evo; stuck between a rock and a hard place.
    Frank Zappa suggested: I’ll give you a simple formula for straightening out the problems of the United States. First, you tax the churches. You take the tax off of capital gains and the tax off of savings. You decriminalize all drugs and tax them same way as you do alcohol. You decriminalize prostitution. You make gambling legal. That will put the budget back on the road to recovery, and you’ll have plenty of tax revenue coming in for all of your social programs, and to run the army.
    But it’ll never happen coz it’s too logical and the, always protected, kowtowed to and much too powerful, churches would never stand for it.
    I heard of another quote that finished with ‘but drugs that transport are taboo’.

  3. the indigenous do not use the coca plant for dietary reasons. there is nothing dietetic about it.  it is used in many ways as a medicinal herb. 
    the coca grower is punished when the people who should be punished are the companies who import the chemicals to make the coca into cocaine. 
    the u.s. govt strong arms the bolivian govt. by threatening to withhold funds because they don’t eradicate the coca plant
    here’s something to ponder…..coca-cola has a contract w/ either the bolivian govt. or private citizens in southern bolivia to send $50 million dollars worth of coca leaves to atlanta every year.  does coca-cola use it in their coke recipe?

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