Need a Little More Who?

In 1989, after twenty six years of continuous production, Doctor Who was cancelled. Like many other fans, I was devastated. My favorite show was gone, there would be no more.

This didn’t turn out to be the case.

Almost instantly the spin offs began. We had original, low budget films featuring supporting characters from the series. Sarah Jane Smith, The Brigadier, even Victoria Watterfield made appearances in these little gems, all portrayed by the original cast. Then we got little movies featuring monsters from the series, like The Auton Trilogy. Then series like PROBE and The Stranger that actually starred previous Doctors in different roles, still slightly connected to the Who Universe.

Virgin books began publishing novels featuring both the most recent Doctor and previous ones.

Marvel Comics continued to publish Doctor Who Monthly.

In 1996, Fox took a stab at it and produced an original Doctor Who TV movie starring Paul McGann.

It was all okay, but it wasn’t enough. It wasn’t right.

Enter Big Finish.

It was 1999 and somebody had a great idea. They decided to produce original Doctor Who audio dramas. Each story who be told in four half hour episodes on 2 CD’s. They’d release a new story every month. They’d even hire the original casts. They produced dramas featuring Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy & Paul McGann, along with their respective companions.

And they were good. Very good. In fact, they were often better than the televised stories of those particular Doctors.

Guess what. They’re still doing it. Big Finish just recently released their 80th monthly drama. That doesn’t count the various spin off audio dramas featuring Sarah Jane, UNIT, The Daleks and even Romana & Leela on Gallifrey.

You can even subscribe to them and have the new story sent to you every month.

So if the new Doctor Who series isn’t enough for you, if you’re jonesing for a little more Doctor in your life, try looking around at http://www.doctorwho.co.uk/drwho/index.shtml

You won’t regret it.

12 thoughts on “Need a Little More Who?

  1. You can never had too much U.N.I.T.  Glad they got a look in in the Slitheen episode.  I’m hoping Torchwood will have reference.

    ‘Jenkins (!) Chap with wings, five rounds, rapid’

  2. KPG: if you’re jonesing for a little more Doctor in your life,

    ‘jonesing’ made me smile.
    I checked the urban dictionary to confirm I understood it correctly.
    You may think: what else could it mean? and I’d agree with you.
    Then I think of the word ‘pissed’. You may think I mean angry. In Oz it can also mean ‘drunk’.
    So the meaning of ‘he was pissed coz he was pissed’, isn’t immediately apparent.
    I think it was Oscar who said: England and America – two countries separated by a common language. LOL

  3. Then I think of the word ‘pissed’.

    Okay, since you mentioned the word pissed, go read this blog entry http://www.warrenellis.com/?p=2594 at Warren Ellis’ site and explain the meaning of the phrase I’m taking the piss horribly out of David Mamet. if you don’t mind. I think I get the general idea, but still, usage I’ve never run across before……

  4. KPG: I’m taking the piss horribly out of David Mamet.

    Ah, yes. I forgot that usage of piss. Lampoon or send-up is the closest, I think.
    Think of the subtle difference between taking a piss and taking the piss.
    Pissed is Nearly as flexible a word as Fucked.
    There’s also ‘pissed-off’ meaning annoyed, but you know that one.
    Pissed off can also mean ‘Elvis has left the building = Elvis has pissed off’
    or Piss-off outa my life, is like Fuck-off outa my life!
    It’s all in the context.
    Years ago I made up a sentence using all its variations in response to an American girl who misunderstood me and became a little afraid, wondering what she’d said to upset me, when I said I was a bit pissed.
    Of course I can’t remember it now. smile

  5. Pissed is Nearly as flexible a word as Fucked.

    Hard to beat the flexibility of “fuck”:
    fuck
    fuck over
    fuck off
    fuck around
    fuck up
    The origin of “fuck” is moot. There are two proto Indo-European roots that may be the source: *peig-, meaning “hostile”, which is related to the words “feud”, “fey”, “fickle”, and “foe”; and *peuk-, “prick”, which gave us “compunction”, “expunge”, “impugn”, “poignant”, “point”, “pounce”, “pugilist”, “punctuate”, “puncture”, “pungent”, and “pygmy”.  Perhaps both had an influence, and thus we have the two common meanings of love (fuck me darling) and hate (fuck off and die).

  6. Fuck is also so universal and immediate.  You never read ’ “Fuck off”,he hinted’.  Doesn’t matter where you are , say ‘Fuck off’ and they understand.

    My dictionary (which is behind a pile of ironing, so I’m doing this from memory) gives Middle German ‘Ficken’ to poke or to prick. 
    F or U nlawful C arnal K nowledge around the necks of sexual criminals in the stocks in the Middle ages is a common myth

  7. LH: Fuck is also so universal and immediate.  You never read ‘ “Fuck off

  8. Thanks for the link with all the usages of “fuck”, John.  Some of them, for instance “fucklings”, were new to me.

    Being a fan of old music, I especially like the tropes.  There was a fad back in the Middle Ages for taking a word, such as “Allelujah”, and troping it- that is, inserting another text between its syllables, and singing the whole thing. For instance:

    “Al-” credo in unum Deum- “le-” et in unum Dominum- “lu-” omnia domine post coitum tristia sunt- “jah”.

    Tropes have pretty much disappeared from the musical landscape, but luckily, they’ve survived to grace our conversation:
    fanfuckingtastic
    infuckingcredible
    unfuckingbelievable

  9. Zilch: Tropes have pretty much disappeared from the musical landscape, but luckily, they’ve survived to grace our conversation:
    fanfuckingtastic
    infuckingcredible
    unfuckingbelievable

    Thank you for introfuckingducing me to the concept.
    My mates and I do our damnedest to keep it afuckinglive. LOL

  10. reminds me of the tribe of 4’ tall African pigmies called the Phaquarwe Tribe. Their main habitat was 5’ tall grass. They used to run around and jump up and down yelling: Where the Phaquarwe?

    The anthropologists have been monitoring them.  They often ask ‘Where the Phaquarwe going’?

    They hunt the Ooomigooli bird.  This rare creature has legs 2 feet high, and lives amoung nettles and thorns 2 foot 1 inch high.  As the move throught the habitat they can be tracked by their distinctive squawk of ‘Ooomigoolies, oomigoolies’

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