Dallas Morning News editorial on Tom DeLay and the “War on Christians.”

There’s a most excellent op-ed piece in the Dallas Morning News about Tom DeLay’s appearance at a conference about the so-called “War on Christians” in Washington recently:

“We have been chosen to live as Christians at a time when our culture is being poisoned and our world is being threatened,” Mr. DeLay told the crowd. “The enemies of virtue may be on the march, but they have not won.” The Texas evangelist who organized the conference likened Mr. DeLay’s legal and ethical woes to – wait for it – the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that the idea of a whipped and beaten Tom DeLay hanging from a cross brings at least a smirk to my lips even if I wouldn’t actually want to see it occur. What makes this editorial so uplifting is the fact that it goes on to discuss how Tom DeLay and his cronies cynically manipulate the faithful:

Take Edwin Buckham, a Washington lobbyist who once served as Mr. DeLay’s chief of staff and personal pastor. The Washington Post reported this week that Mr. Buckham received more than a third of all the money collected by the U.S. Family Network, a nonprofit organization he set up as a DeLay staffer. Mr. DeLay promoted the organization as a national grass-roots group engaged in pro-family activism on Capitol Hill. In fact, records indicate that USFN was a front that took in millions, mostly from clients of felonious lobbyist Jack Abramoff, and lavished the largesse heavily on Mr. Buckham and his wife.

Or take former top DeLay aide Michael Scanlon, who pleaded guilty to corruption charges in the Abramoff scandal. In an e-mail released by a Senate committee, Mr. Scanlon discusses how his clients can use the gullibility of Christians to their own advantage: “The wackos get their information through the Christian right, Christian radio, mail, the Internet and telephone trees. … Simply put, we want to bring out the wackos to vote against something and make sure the rest of the public lets the whole thing slip past them.”

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: It’s a good thing for a lot of Christians out there that I am cursed with scruples. Fleecing overly credulous Christians is so easy that it’s practically a cottage industry these days. The fact that it’s done most often by their supposedly fellow believers says volumes about how much morality it really inspires. You’ve got to wonder about a belief system that would allow the likes of Tom DeLay to not only get away with abuses like that, but would then hold him up as being comparable to Jesus Christ to boot.

Hey, the Good Book tells them they should be fools and it seems like they’re doing a great job of complying!

6 thoughts on “Dallas Morning News editorial on Tom DeLay and the “War on Christians.”

  1. I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that the idea of a whipped and beaten Tom DeLay hanging from a cross brings at least a smirk to my lips even if I wouldn’t actually want to see it occur.

    I’ll admit that the vision in my mind actually makes me want to laugh out loud. Unfortunately, even crucified, DeLay would probably be wearing the same smirk that he wore in his mugshot. Can’t keep a good Tom DeLay down, or so he’d love all of us to believe.

    Anyway, the “War on Christians?” The far-Right’s rhetoric always elucidates its projections and its love of combat and warfare. I’m surprised more wingnuts haven’t devised the coming of the “War on Easter” yet.

  2. This is something that occurs to me from time to time: the ease with which I could probably earn a ton of money by nefariously defrauding or misleading zealous believers.  Hell, the only thing between me and piles of cash is my idea of ethics. 

    For the luvvapete, it only takes a slice of burnt toast and a funny-shaped potato chip and VOILA!

    Jesus’ face on a snack + eBay = $$$

  3. Hell, the only thing between me and piles of cash is my idea of ethics.

    Oh, the burden of (useful) ethics? Good for you, wish that there were fewer of the alternative form, but what can we do?

    There are Christians and then there are those that quack like Christians but really just play act and benefit from Christians (sort of like shepards – say “fisher’s of men anyone?” – fleecing and taking people in). I think even Daryl would welcome less of the leech variety, but maybe not.

    What really galls is when the leech version is involved in deciding the form of government in this country, what will or won’t be law. But maybe true Christians are able to say “hey, at least the laws are being changed in a way that will be ‘favorable’ for our wants?” So much for America, where everyone could live together regardless of religious belief.

  4. The only problem with fleecing Christians is one would, occasionally at least, have to hang out with them, go to churches, prayer meetings and whatnot, sit there with a straight face as you discuss the war on the faithful from us evil non-believers.

    Thanks, but I’d rather sleep in.

  5. Yay for Easter heathens “plowing the fields”!

    After reading the comments about Max von Sydow, I find using April 10 for Easter less and less arbitrary and more inspired.  That or make it coincide with Bike Week in Daytona.

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