I Hope Alito Sees/Agrees With This

If you’re curious to see how your state ranked in the Pro Life / Pro Choice debate have a look at this breakdown compiled by Survey USA.
Any surprises? Do you see results you expected from your state?

This version sorted by PRO-LIFE VS PRO-CHOICE (Released 09/12/05) in descending order:

Pro Life / Pro Choice
 
1 Utah 61% / 33%
2 Louisiana 57% / 36% 
3 Arkansas 55% / 40% 
4 Idaho 55% / 41% 
5 Alabama 54% / 36% 
6 Mississippi 53% / 39% 
7 West Virginia 53% / 39% 
8 Kentucky 51% / 42% 
9 Tennessee 51% 42% 
10 Indiana 50% / 47% 
11 South Dakota 49% / 47% 
11 Missouri 48% / 45% 
13 Oklahoma 48% / 47%
14 Nebraska 47% / 49% 
15 North Dakota 47% / 47% 
15 Kansas 45% / 50% 
17 North Carolina 44% / 47% 
17 Pennsylvania 44% / 51% 
17 Georgia 43% / 52%
20 South Carolina 43% / 47% 
20 Texas 43% / 52% 
22 Michigan 42% / 55% 
23 Montana 42% / 53% 
23 Ohio 42% 52% 
25 Iowa 41% / 56% 
26 Arizona 39% / 56% 
27 Minnesota 39% / 56% 
27 New Mexico 39% / 56% 
29 Virginia 39% / 54% 
30 Wisconsin 39% / 57% 
30 Wyoming 39% / 57% 
32 Alaska 37% / 58% 
32 Florida 36% / 58% 
34 Hawaii 35% 57%
34 Colorado 34% / 61% 
36 Illinois 33% / 58% 
37 Maine 33% / 63% 
38 Oregon 33% / 62% 
38 Nevada 32% / 64% 
38 Rhode Island 32% / 63% 
41 Washington 32% / 63% 
42 Delaware 31%/ 63% 
43 New Jersey 31% / 63% 
43 Maryland 29% / 65% 
45 New Hampshire 29% / 67% 
46 California 28% / 65% 
46 Massachusetts 28% / 68% 
48 New York 27% / 66% 
48 Connecticut 26% / 68% 
50 Vermont 25% / 70%

Weighted Average: 38% 56%
(‘Weighted Average’ means each state is weighted proportionally to its share of USA population. For example, California, the most populated state, is given 71 times the weight of WY the least populated state, in a weighted avg.”)

Unweighted Average: 41% / 54%

Adults age 18+ in each of the 50 states were interviewed by SurveyUSA 8/12/05 to 8/14/05.

7 thoughts on “I Hope Alito Sees/Agrees With This

  1. I wouldn’t have figured Kansas to be slightly pro-choice, either. Nice to have stats that say “the majority of Americans are pro-choice”. At least that’s some solace.

  2. I think there’s a lot of oversimplication in folks being labeled as either one side of the argument or other.  There are a lot of nuances and subtleties in folks’ position on abortion and abortion rights (as well as a lot of discomfort).

    That said … what does that have to do with the subject line?  To my mind, the last thing I want is a SCOTUS Justice who cares a whit for public opinion polls (esp. on controversial subjects).  Indeed, one of the key roles of the judiciary (and of our law) is to prevent the majority from riding roughshod over the minority.

  3. ***Dave: That said … what does that have to do with the subject line?  To my mind, the last thing I want is a SCOTUS Justice who cares a whit for public opinion polls (esp. on controversial subjects).  Indeed, one of the key roles of the judiciary (and of our law) is to prevent the majority from riding roughshod over the minority.

    Exactly, ***Dave, that is the responsibility of the judiciary and especially of the Supreme Court. But have you noticed the level of positioning that takes place before a justice is even approved? Bush assured his base as often as possible that Myers would not be a detriment to conservative judicial philosophy. He is not a leader who seeks nonpartisan, neutral nominees. 

    So suggesting that Alito, if confirmed, should accede to the results of a poll concerning abortion or gay marriage or whatever hot button issue we may face is ridiculous, but this is how SC Justices are confirmed; with a majority being convinced they will favor party or popular ideals.

    By the title of the post I more meant that if Alito realizes the majority of Americans feel differently than he does concerning abortion rights, that he, like Harriet Myers, will remove himself from consideration. Or even that Bush, seeing the direction the political wind is blowing, will reconsider his choice.

    Sure, that’s a fantastic hope to have, but I’ve got other hopes just as unrealistic for my country; I’m constantly championing fantastically hopeless causes.

    That and I would love for the next justice to be a supporter of pro-choice issues.

    I was somewhat surprised by Texas too but then remembered that Dallas and Austin skew the mix. Many of their citizens relocated from saner parts of the country.

    Alabama, at least, does not surprise me.

  4. I’m with ***Dave on this one. A proper Supreme Court Justice deals with the law and how it relates to the Constitution, not with what the popular opinion happens to be or his own personal biases.

  5. So suggesting that Alito, if confirmed, should accede to the results of a poll concerning abortion or gay marriage or whatever hot button issue we may face is ridiculous, but this is how SC Justices are confirmed; with a majority being convinced they will favor party or popular ideals.

    By the title of the post I more meant that if Alito realizes the majority of Americans feel differently than he does concerning abortion rights, that he, like Harriet Myers, will remove himself from consideration. Or even that Bush, seeing the direction the political wind is blowing, will reconsider his choice.

    Ah.  Not likely to happen, as you say.  And probably just as well, since I’d rather not have SCOTUS nominations (essentially) voted on by popular poll (for many of the same reasons). 

    It is legitimate for the President to select a qualified candidate whose political philosophy is in keeping with his own (recalling that most presidents have ended up being irked at the justices they appointed).  I am most concerned with the first point (qualifications), and am moderately resigned to the latter, being only able to put my faith in the political instincts of the Administration and the Senate.

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