“There is a sniff of politics in the air”: George W. Bush

—in a closed door session with congressional Republicans, Washington, DC, May 16, 2002.

Sometimes I have to admit I am dumbfounded. The man we call President is a blithering idiot and only a few of us seem to notice. Great numbers adore and respect him and I feel I must be the odd one instead because I fail to recognize his greatness.

I sometimes think this administration is daring us to fault them. Bush should have been criminally charged for at least one of a number of reasons, including: graft, cronyism, misrepresentation of facts leading to war, elitism, murder, allowing torture of combatants and non-combatants alike, support of big polluters, smear campaigns, violations of international law and other stupid actions.

Is it just me or is Bush more Teflon coated then 100 Ronald Reagans collectively could hope to be?

Criticisms of his administration are inevitable, yet they flaunt their invulnerabilities. It’s like they’re playing a grand game of “Catch Me If You Can” and they’ve got the powers of invisibility and immunity. How else can you explain the many Bush quotes that scream INEPT while simultaneously screaming UNTOUCHABLE?

Here are just a few of the misspeaks he’s made,  that seem to me to toy with our petty insignificances:

See, in my line of work you got to keep repeating things over and over and over again for the truth to sink in, to kind of catapult the propaganda.
—Social Security “conversation,” Greece, New York, May 24, 2005

[T]he American people now are beginning to realize we have a serious problem when it comes to Social Security. And that problem begins with people like me.
—remarks at the Republican National Committee Gala, Washington, DC, May 17, 2005

A submarine could take this place out.
—comment to his tour guide at the Clinton Presidential Center, Little Rock, AR, November 18, 2004

With the campaign over, Americans are expecting a bipartisan effort and results. I’ll reach out to everyone who shares our goals.
—Washington, DC, November 4, 2004

I’m mindful in a free society that people can worship if they want to or not.
—during the final 2004 presidential debate, Tempe, AZ, October 13, 2004

I went to the Congress last September and proposed fundamental—supplemental funding, which is money for armor and body parts….
—Erie, PA, September 4, 2004

Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we. They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we.
—speaking to top Pentagon brass, Washington, DC, August 5, 2004; reported by Reuters.

I kind of like ducking questions
—at the Associated Press luncheon, Washington, DC, April 21, 2004

I’m sure something will pop into my head here in the midst of this press conference, with all the pressure of trying to come up with an answer, but it hadn’t yet.
—responding to the question of what lessons had been learned from 9/11, press conference, Washington, DC, April 13, 2004

In my judgment, when the United States says there will be serious consequences, and if there isn’t serious consequences, it creates adverse consequences.
—appearing on NBC’s Meet the Press, February 8, 2004.

I appreciate people’s opinions, but I’m more interested in news. And the best way to get the news is from objective sources. And the most objective sources I have are people on my staff who tell me what’s happening in the world.
—Fox News interview with Brit Hume, September 22, 2003.

We want those objections heard, of course—every citizen needs to hear a voice.
—Summerhaven, AZ, August 11, 2003.

Security is the essential roadblock to achieving the road map to peace.
—Washington, D.C., July 25, 2003.

I’m also not very analytical. You know I don’t spend a lot of time thinking about myself, about why I do things.
—aboard AirForce One, June 4 2003

You’re free. And freedom is beautiful. And, you know, it’ll take time to restore chaos and order….
—responding to a reporter who asked what Bush’s message to the Iraqi people was, Washington, DC, April 13, 2003

I’m the person who gets to decide, not you.
—reacting to a reporter’s statement in the lead-in to his question that “we’re headed to war in Iraq,” Crawford, TX, December 31, 2002.

One of the problems we have is that enough people can’t find work in America.
—Bentonville, AR, November 4, 2002.

You need to listen carefully to the debates that goes on in our nation’s capital. You see, some of them are—goes on with people trying to get to the nation’s capital. Some of them, they talk about the government’s money.
—Manchester, NH, October 5, 2002.

We need an energy bill that encourages consumption.
—Trenton, NJ, September 23, 2002.

…[T]here is a value system that cannot be compromised, and that is the values that we praise. And if the values are good enough for our people, they ought to be good enough for others, not in a way to impose because these are God-given values. These aren’t United States-created values. These are values of freedom and the human condition and mothers loving their children.
—interviewed by Bob Woodward, Crawford, TX, August 20, 2002.

I’m the commander—see, I don’t need to explain—I do not need to explain why I say things. That’s the interesting thing about being the president. Maybe somebody needs to explain to me why they say something, but I don’t feel like I owe anybody an explanation.
—interviewed by Bob Woodward, Crawford, TX, August 20, 2002

I read the report put out by the bureaucracy.
—referring to his own Environmental Protection Agency report to the United Nations on global warming, June 4, 2002.

We hold dear what our Declaration of Independence says, that all have got uninalienable rights….
—addressing community and religious leaders in Moscow, May 24, 2002.

Some of the biggest sources of air pollution are the power plants, which send tons of admissions into our air.
—Wilmington, NY, April 22, 2002 (Earth Day).

Sometimes when I sleep at night I think of “Hop on Pop.”
—Penn. State University, April 2, 2002.

But there needs to be a focused, coalition effort in the region against peace.
—discussing the Middle East, Crawford, TX, March 30, 2002.

I don’t intend to read it all.
—referring to the education bill he had just signed, Hamilton, OH, January 8, 2002.

This administration is doing everything we can to end the stalemate in an efficient way. We’re making the right decisions to bring the solution to an end.
—Washington, DC, April 10, 2001

They want the federal government controlling Social Security like it’s some kind of federal program.
—St. Charles, Missouri, November 2, 2000

After all, religion has been around a lot longer than Darwinism.
—reported in George Magazine, September, 2000

It’s almost sad the way Bush can accidentally speak honestly. If he really knows the subjects he’s covering, you would think he would make far fewer mistakes. Unfortunately he often comes across as unprepared and uninformed. If Rove truly is his puppet master, why is Rove so (grudgingly at times, for sure) respected?

I wouldn’t want to spend even one moment in Bush’s head. I’m sure doing so would drive me insane. I feel he’s warned us for years not to take him seriously but too many still do. Why? On what planet would a buffoon like him be elected president twice?

Select quotes borrowed from The Dubya Report collection which has many more for our (amusements?).

http://www.thedubyareport.com/

8 thoughts on ““There is a sniff of politics in the air”: George W. Bush

  1. Ah, nothing like a good steaming cup-o-hate to burn the rationals’ pallette.

    I’m a huge fan of Clinton’s Administration.  Yet, i wouldn’t dare mistake the man’s personality (which i like), his personal indiscretions (which are irrelevant), or other personal attributes (such as his intelligence or penchant for white illegal drugs) with his administration’s (e.g., “Let’s all do another line and then finish this speech ‘right’!”.  (Seriously, no jokes.)

    Yet, despite the Great American Disaster of Personal Politics….
    Clinton’s biggest criticism of today’s Democratic opposition is the profound presence of personal attacks.  He believes this faction within our midst has done more harm than good, especially in border-state elections.  (Somewhere in the background you should be hearing rabid calls of “F the border-states!  We don’t need no independents!”  …  yeah right.

    Rabid dog poltical enthusiasts have, unfortunately, proliferated amongst the DNC’s lower ranks.  Wholly unappealing—and totally dissuasive.

    Dissuasive.

    It’s best to criticise policy, not people.
    Otherwise…  Well, Italian-style-stability governance anyone?  And they love coke, too.  It’s no wonder America’s political dialogue is such a rubbish heap of hate.  Most of ‘em are addicted to Personal Political Attacks.

    If you want our government to actually do things, like debate and hew policy that functions, make sure your criticisms are constructive, and a tad less destructive.

    Think long term, and non-emotional, for best political results.  Emotions, and their peddlers, is the real enemy to American society.

    rob@egoz.org

  2. rob, if you think calling me a hater of Bush reveals my pettiness, think again. You cannot use petty and Bush in the same sentence and remain credible. The man and his ideologies, actions and inactions are monumentally destructive and deserving of contempt. Too, he can’t make a speech without embarrassing himself. His intellect is burned away with alcohol and drug abuse and this is the man we chose to represent the pinnacle of American statesmanship. He’s a badly schooled superstitious fool, a coward, a laze and a greedy opportunist!

    Rabid dog poltical enthusiasts have, unfortunately, proliferated amongst the DNC’s lower ranks.  Wholly unappealing—and totally dissuasive.

    I disagree. I think we need more expressions of righteous indignation. We have an administration worthy of being tarred and feathered then tossed, still tarred and feathered, in jail for the rest of their natural lives. Rabid is a term that describes them much more effectively than it represents their detractors.

    The true problem is that we aren’t indignant enough. We aren’t insulting enough! We aren’t mad enough! We’re as pathetic as they are because we sit and suffer, in silence, the madness of King George.

    It’s best to criticise policy, not people.

    Some have actually been geniuses of criticism, advising soundly and respectfully. They aren’t in positions to advise like Bush’s cabinet members are and Bush doesn’t read the papers; he remains blissfully unaware of sage advice.

    If you want our government to actually do things, like debate and hew policy that functions, make sure your criticisms are constructive, and a tad less destructive.

    Yes, I do want my government to debate and hew policy that functions and I want all representatives to be involved. Sadly what we get instead are purely partisan investigations and big business lobbyists. The might of financial reward disallows the voices of those who deserve considerations. We have a government that graft and grifters built.

    Think long term, and non-emotional, for best political results.  Emotions, and their peddlers, is the real enemy to American society.

    Emotion is what powers movements: the emotions of citizens who desire equalities, opportunities and satisfactions. Perceived rights gain validation when we invest them with emotional desires: Without the emotion, the passion and the sentiment procedure cannot be considered humanely.

    Think long term, and non-emotional, for best political results.  Emotions, and their peddlers, is the real enemy to American society.

    Non-emotional means non-meaningful. Do you really want to live in a country built solely with cold logic and dispassionate detachment? Is it even possible for a human to act that way?

    Devil’s advocates like you are useful. Devils advocating policy typically aren’t.

  3. His intellect is burned away with alcohol and drug abuse

    And religion!  Don’t forget religion.  He is one of those scared folks who wants to get Creationism and IDism equal time in our public schools.

  4. If you truely believe that he is christian.I have my doubts.I remember hearing somewhere that he refuses to answer questions regarding the 1st 40 years of his life,when he was hellraising and drug taking..professing himself as a born again christian excuses him from all this behavior – gives him a clean slate!

  5. “[The concept of a political party] serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the Community with ill founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection…”

    I am a big-time advocate of the two party system in America, until the sunny age when political parties are legislated away in America’s Constitution (probably within 50-100 years).  Until that new era of enlightnment, i don’t think three or more parties in America is a healthy thing, with plenty of examples of the ineptitude it fosters in a states’ governance and ability to plan long-term both economically and geopolitically (e.g., Italy, Germany, Israel, etc.).

    “And we replaced OldThought with NewThought, thanks to science and war…”
    Until we either genetically diminish or effeciently teach our children (at a very young age, well before pre-school) not to engage in emotion-centric behavior and reasoning, a two-party system is the most stable form of government for America.  The two-party system is an effective way to channel the otherwise irrational “Emotionals” amongst us to productively expend their energies towards something socially stable.  Three or more parties merely highlight the radicals, and empower those who want conflagration more than the advancement of American society towards the CityOnTheHill.

    The Two-Party System: in loco parentis
    Humans, as demonstrated above this post, have a carnal urge to think in tribal ways.  Us-vs-Them.  Me-vs-Him.  The two-party system is the best way to harness these types of humans into non-violent, less-emotional, constructive criticism of governmental policies and systems.  But, like any method, it can break under a flood of pressure from the emotion-centric masses.

    What got the Emotionals in such an overly excitied frenzy ?
    With such events as 9/11 Version1-3, and sundry natural disasters, the emotionally prone amongst us become more and more aggitated.  This is when the rational-based thinkers need to stand up, speak loudly (to be heard above their shrill cacophony of frenzied pronouncements), and bring America’s political system back into a healthier state of dialog.

    Listen to Clinton
    Get off the Peronsal Political Attacks bandwagon, cause it’s about to be ditched, by both parties, for the good of America.  Start attacking policy, or be left behind.

    rob@egoz.org

  6. I am a big-time advocate of the two party system in America, until the sunny age when political parties are legislated away in America’s Constitution (probably within 50-100 years).

    I should know better, but I’ll bite:  what in the ever lovin’ world makes you think that will happen, rob?  What sort of information are you privy to?  Predictions about politics are notoriously unreliable.

    Until that new era of enlightnment, i don’t think three or more parties in America is a healthy thing, with plenty of examples of the ineptitude it fosters in a states’ governance and ability to plan long-term both economically and geopolitically (e.g., Italy, Germany, Israel, etc.).

    You’re right- America is certainly not inept economically or geopolitically nowadays, aside from a few minor goofs such as a teeny national debt and a foreign war hardly worth mentioning…

  7. As i’ve stated before, sometimes things change dramatically.

    Americans and Europeans have a difficult time grasping such a notion (most are probably ideologically incapable of it as well), given the abundance of resources in their respective Disney lands.  But, as oil sales to the West become heavily restricted (by such things as the now slowly emerging Greater Eastern/Sino trading and military bloc) and other related trade embargos (e.g., food), things shall truly change dramatically, foremost being the American political dynamic, especially on the domestic front.

    A common enemy of enough magnitude unites enemies.

    While the governments operating deficit (now exceeding 5% of GDP) is a real, serious concern, when compared to such states as Italy, or even Germany and Israel, America has far greater potential than these to wipe away such a huge figure in a matter of several years; Let’s remember the booming tax-revenue days of the later 1990’s.  (Unless, of course, ideology blinds such considerations.)

    I don’t consider the usg’s operating deficit that much of a long-term problem when compared to the above mentioned factor of a Sino/Eastern military trade bloc, and one other coming/promised event:

    a multiple city-killing terrorist attack.
    This promised event will, without much doubt, shatter our economy beyond recognition.  A regional version of Threads anyone?  Too hard to imagine?

    Many of today’s Americans and their grown children shall, unfortunately, be working in agricultural fields and other hopelessly low-tech jobs come this era.

    Sci-fi ?

    alQaeda has invested an astounding level of patience, tens of thousands of man hours within our own brightly shining cities, hundreds of millions of US dollars, and considerable gold bullion to make sure it is anything but fantasy, but rather a lasting horror for the Western world’s future generations.

    May i suggest you all work on your potatoe-pulling skills.

    Under this umbrella of catastrophe Americans will, oft under force, unite.  That’s the information i’m “privy” to, albeit all of it publicly available for the not faint of heart, or ideologically blinded.

    rob@egoz.org

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