Now the big threat to music is CD burning, not file sharing.

According to this Yahoo News article the music industry is now bitching that CD burners are what’s really undermining sales of new music CDs:

“Burned” CDs accounted for 29 percent of all recorded music obtained by fans in 2004, compared to 16 percent attributed to downloads from online file-sharing networks, said Mitch Bainwol, chief executive for the Recording Industry Association of America.

“CD burning is a problem that is really undermining sales,” Bainwol said in an interview prior to speaking before about 750 members of the National Association of Recording Merchandisers in San Diego Friday.

Copy protection technology “is an answer to the problem that clearly the marketplace is going to see more of,” he added.

These guys aren’t going to be happy until they’ve taken away every single possible fair use right you have to the music and videos you purchase. Once again they’re only hurting the legitimate customers as nothing they’ve done has stopped anything from being copied by those folks determined to do so.

4 thoughts on “Now the big threat to music is CD burning, not file sharing.

  1. These guys aren’t going to be happy until they’ve taken away every single possible fair use right you have to the music and videos you purchase.

    That’s for sure. Hopefully people will stop buying music from them. There are quite a few places on the net to get good (though not mainstream) music on the net for a reasonable price that is not encumbered by digital rights garbage.

    I will dig around a bit to see if I can dig some of them up (it has been a while). Most smaller (non big label bands) are more than happy to get their music out for people to hear. Big media is destroying music in the same way that big distributors are destroying video games.

    What was the promise when we switched from tape to cd? Cheaper music? Hrmm…I do not recall ever paying ~$20.00 for a single cassette tape, but see some of my old favorites marked up to $18 for a cd (that has been around for over 15 years). Color me stupid, but I am thinking that is not cheaper.

    I know for a fact that there are small bands of all kinds of music out there selling their cds for as low as $5 out there, it can just be hard to find them. It is also worth noting that they often put up lower bitrate mp3s so people can at least decide if they like the music before they purchase it. Again, I will post back links to a few sites that do this if I can remember what they are.

    As to this costing them money…well, if the person could not have paid $18.00+ for it in the first place (because you know, food actually matters), then it cannot be counted as a lost sale. In fact, I would call it free marketing.

  2. the riaa isn’t ever going to be happy. they’re treating this with outdated methods meant for the real world. instead of punishing users who acquire music illegally, why not reward people who actually buy music?

  3. Makes perfect sense to me.  After all, these guys are first and foremost DISTRIBUTION companies.  To maximize profits, they have to control all avenues of distribution and if they can’t control it, they must choke it off.

    The only way this nonsense is going to stop is when some big name artists go the Image route and break away from the big distribution companies.

  4. Hmm, makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside as I burn my friend a mix CD of songs I got from a file-sharing program.

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