Michigan has a Pledge to its flag.

Here’s something I didn’t know before: Michigan has a pledge of its own for the State Flag. It was officially adopted by a state law in 1972 and, amazingly enough, it manages not to violate the establishment clause. I’m willing to bet most Michiganians aren’t aware of this pledge. Here’s how it reads:

    “I pledge allegiance to the flag of Michigan, and to the state for which it stands, two beautiful peninsulas united by a bridge of steel, where equal opportunity and justice to all is our ideal.”

So it’s not the most inspiring of pledges one might read in their lifetime, but if we ever have an urgent need for a pledge at least we’ve got one.

5 thoughts on “Michigan has a Pledge to its flag.

  1. …and it doesn’t make any claim of Michigan being “under god”…..

  2. They ain’t the only ones! Texas does to. Surprise you? Here is the piece of beauty that helps me achieve smoother bowel movements:
    Pledge of Allegiance to the State Flag
    (a) The pledge of allegiance to the state flag is, “Honor the Texas flag; I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas, one and indivisible.”

    (b) The pledge of allegiance to the state flag should be rendered by all present except those in uniform by standing at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. Individuals who are not in uniform and who are wearing a headdress that is easily removeable should remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, with the hand over the heart. Individuals in uniform should remain silent, face the flag, and render the military salute.

    (c) The pledge of allegiance to the state flag may be recited at all public and private meetings at which the pledge of allegiance to the United States flag is recited and at state historical events and celebrations.

    (d) The pledge of allegiance to the state flag should be recited after the pledge of allegiance to the United States flag if both are recited.

  3. I told my boys that if they did the Texas pledge at school, and they didn’t want to say it, they should remain silent.  If questioned, they should point out that they are citizens of the United States, but only residents of Texas (since no one is a citizen of an individual state).

    So far, they haven’t pushed it in school.

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