Two different versions of Nigerian scam in the same morning.

Would someone please reassure me that this scam is popping up enough these days that even the incredibly stupid people must know it’s a scam by now? Please? This morning I woke to a slow net connection (probably due to the storms) and the following email in my inbox:

My Beloved.Mr/Mrs Jenkins

In brief introduction, I’m Mrs Helen Harvel from Sierra-Leone. My husband Mr Nelson Harvel was the former operations manager of the Sierra Leone Gold and Diamond cooperation during the tenure of the democratically elected head of state president Ahmed Tijan Kabbah who was forced out of office by the rebels led by major Paul Koromah. As a result of the otherthrow, top government officials and top civil servants who the rebel soldiers captured at the mining town of Bangashi district where he was in charge, where all killed, may his gentle soul rest in peace.

They don’t know if I’m a Mr. or a Mrs. and yet I am still “beloved” by whomever this person is. If that ain’t a clue and a half right there…

Then the very next email in my inbox starts like this:

STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL.

ATTENTION:

I am highly delighted about being in contact with you following a good recommendation made about you by my late husband before his death.

I am Mrs MERCY FOLLY of Zimbabwe, the wife, to late minority right wing activist/environmentalist and leader of the movement for the survival of white farmers in Zimbabwe.My husband Mr. Ben Matshe, who was killed during the on going war against white farmers in Zimbabwe.

Considering the fact that I don’t know anyone from Zimbabwe, let alone anyone with the name of Ben Matshe, it’s hard to imagine how such a person could make such a good recommendation about me. Naturally, in both cases, the husband is dead and the wife is looking to me for help. The first email takes the traditional route with a request for me to respond if I am interested so they can send me further instructions. The folks behind the second email aren’t as patient as it contains instructions that I should send them:

    1. Name and address of your bank

    2. Account number to be used for the remittance

    3. Your private tele, fax number and full address.

So the matter can be taken care of right away. The first email is offering me up to 20% of $20.5 million (roughly $4.1 million) whereas the second email is only offering me 18% of $12.5 million (about $2.25 million).

Does anyone still fall for this crap? If not, then why do I still get so many of these friggin’ emails? Is there still some idiots out there who haven’t fallen for this scam already? PLEASE tell me everyone is wise to this by now.

13 thoughts on “Two different versions of Nigerian scam in the same morning.

  1. Hehe I don’t know if you’ve seen this one or not Les:

    DEAR SIR / MADAM,

    I AM GEORGE WALKER BUSH, SON OF THE FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA GEORGE HERBERT WALKER BUSH, AND CURRENTLY SERVING AS
    PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. THIS LETTER MIGHT SURPRISE YOU BECAUSE WE HAVE NOT MET NEITHER IN PERSON NOR BY CORRESPONDENCE. I
    CAME TO KNOW OF YOU IN MY SEARCH FOR A RELIABLE AND REPUTABLE PERSON TO HANDLE A VERY CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS TRANSACTION, WHICH INVOLVES THE TRANSFER OF A HUGE SUM OF MONEY TO AN ACCOUNT REQUIRING MAXIMUM CONFIDENCE.

    I AM WRITING YOU IN ABSOLUTE CONFIDENCE PRIMARILY TO SEEK YOUR ASSISTANCE IN ACQUIRING OIL FUNDS THAT ARE PRESENTLY TRAPPED IN THE
    REPUBLIC OF IRAQ… (the rest is at http://philip.greenspun.com/humor/bush-nigerian-spam)

  2. Scott, it’s the #1 scam? Who the hell doesn’t know about this scam by now? What kind of freakin’ computer literate hermit do you have to be to not have heard of this scam? How can these people not have already received similar messages hundreds of times over by now!?!? I GET THEM ALMOST DAILY AND I’VE NEVER SENT ANYONE ANYTHING! (You know it’s coming so here it is) What the fuck is wrong with these people?!

    Caz, that’s just beautiful! I laughed for a good couple minutes over that one.

  3. Alas, when free money is waved under the nose, a person can sometimes lose that fine sense of skepticism that one normally has.

    Believe it or not, when I was 25 I came within an inch of falling for the pigeon drop, the oldest con in the book. For those of you not in the know, a person (in my case a nice old lady) comes up to you and tells you they found some money. A good deal of money. They go into a nearby bank to find out what they should do and they come back they got great news. You can split the money after 30 days. All you have to do is come up with half the amount (the con comes up with the other half). So you go and get half the amount, combine it with the half the con gives you, and the con gives you the money to take to the bank. Unfortunately the con switched envelops on you, and instead of money, you have an envelop full of shredded newspaper.

    Heh, if I had not mentioned what was going on to a magician friend of mine I would have been out 25,000. And I KNOW about the pigeon drop.

    Never underestimate the skill of a con. IF it did not work, you would not be getting so many appeals in the mail…

  4. I know someone who fell for the 419 scam about a decade ago—it started in snail-mail, and he ended up losing $10,000. He rues it now, but he’s a millionaire so not as much as you and I would…

    Folks in the Red States are often non-computer literate. It’s scary when you realize that AOL is the #1 ISP in the world…

  5. It’s interesting that you should mention the 419 scam as we just had an argument today at lunch about whether or not the person who falls for said scam is responsible for the bill he runs up. Co-worker H insists that the victim is not responsible because the phone company has to inform him of the costs involved in such a call by law even if the victim is the one initiating such a call. I disagreed with his assessment and I intend to do a little research on it as a result.

  6. My sister’s fiance lost $6,000 to a scam artist from “Nigeria” last month.  I couldn’t believe it.  There are people out there who just don’t use computers on a normal basis.  Why, just last night I had to teach my dad how to read his e-mail.  He didn’t understand the concept of double click.  Anyway, I’m done ranting.

  7. My ex’s sister and brother-in-law have lost over $100,000.00 and their home and business.  The sad thing about it is they still believe it is true.  Even after seeing all the sites about the scam, they think they are involved in something “different”.  These are intelligent, successful people.  Their adult son is involved as well and has pretty much lost everything too but they are all brainwashed.  Is this common with these scams???

  8. I don’t know if it’s common to these scams in general, but I do know that there must still be some people out there silly enough to fall for them as they keep showing up in my inbox.

    In the case of your ex’s sister and brother-in-law they’re probably deluding themselves to avoid facing the reality that they’ve been duped out of $100,000. That’s an awful lot of money to piss away on a scam and some people just can’t come to grips with the reality of it. It will, eventually, hit home and they’re probably going to be emotional wrecks when it does. Can you imagine having to try to reconcile that you’ve pissed away $100,000? If you’re Bill Gates it’s probably no big deal, but for the average person that’s a lot of money to throw away.

  9. Hello The nigerian scam does suck, it is allmost laughable, so many people have fallen for it, and I believe it is dying, nigerian scammers are now using the phone instead of email,

    I have a great page dedicated to the nigerian scam, Including AUDIO FILES of conversations with nigerian scammers, to take a look at how the nigerian scams work and to read on some people who have lost so much money, visit my website..

    by the way I aint nice to people who fall for the nigerian scam, so if youve fallen for it, I dont think you will enjoy my page very much as it makes fun of imbeciles.

    cheers.

    http://www.vladc.com

  10. Hello all,
    A new nigerian scam below? Its in all caps, just like the regular nigerian money transfer scams. I also did a trace of the full headers (using UXN Spam Combat, which pointed me to: http://www.geektools.com
    (and http://www.ripe.net/)

    Result of the whois IP trace of 193.220.45.27:
    person:    Bayo Sanni
    address:    Zealod Nig Ltd
    e-mail:    bsanni@yahoo.com
    phone:      +234 8034023557
    nic-hdl:    BSA7-RIPE
    changed:    registry@taide.net 20030505
    source:    RIPE

    The only problem being, if you do a google search for “Bayo Sanni” it turns up some guy or at least 3 guys with the same name in nigerian govt:

    http://www.beyondenergy.com/directors.htm
    Bayo Sanni
    An alumnus of University of Lagos with first and second degrees in Finance. Bayo has a total of 13 years bankng experience with NDIC, Zenith Bank and Citibank culminating in an Assistant General Manager position with TRUSTBANK.

    http://www.highway.idsc.gov.eg/aii/care.htm
    Bayo Sanni of the National Centre for technology Management at Obafemi Awolowo University

    A coverup or simply a false name in the registry@taide.net ?

    Slippery bastards!

    What a waste of time!

    ranting,
    Cherrie

  11. I got a new version today I was really supprised with:
    Dear Daniel,

    DC Group Inc. has announced a new job opening and proposes you to join our team.
    Our company provides multiple services, including financial and specifically
    escrow services for online auctions. Our clients are large auctions with a large
    number like ebay.com, yahoo.com and private auctions with a small number of clients.

    All payments from our customers are processed via bank transfers. In fact, we
    need to get payments for our products as soon as possible to be able to provide
    our services quickly. The problem is that we are unable to process customer?s
    payments fast enough because international bank transfers take about 7-15
    working days to complete. We lose much money because of delays that?s why we
    have opened new job position for solving this problem.

    Please note: this job takes 2-3 hours a day and gives much free time to be
    employed elsewhere. We are looking only for applicants who meet our requirements
    and can be successful employees in nearest future.

    Your functions:
    1. Receive payments from our customers;
    2. Deduct 8% (your commission);
    3. Forward payments according instructions to any of our offices.

    Financial Agent position is offered on Trial Period basis. During first 30 days,
    your base salary will be $2,3k per month, excluding percentage from clients?
    payments. Also you?ll be trained and instructed by our personnel managers. After
    the trial period base salary is increased up to $3000 a month. NOTE: You?ll be
    given a chance to start working full-time in one of our offices.

    Please fill in the form below

    ============FORM==========FORM==========
    First name:___________________________
    Last name:_______________________________
    Country of residence:__________________________
    Contact phone:____________________
    Preferred call time:_____________________
    ============FORM==========FORM==========

    and email it to: Job.dc.diana@gmail.com

    We found your resume at http://www.hotjobs.com. This letter confirms that your resume
    has been duly processed and your skills completely meet our requirements for the
    Financial Manager vacancy.

    Awaiting your prompt reply.
    Diana Green

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